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I'm just trying reflection :

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Reflection;


public class CTest {
    public string test;
}

public class MyClass
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        CTest cTest = new CTest();
    	Type t=cTest.GetType();
    	PropertyInfo p = t.GetProperty("test");
    	cTest.test = "hello";
        //instruction below makes crash
    	string test = (string)p.GetValue(cTest,null);

        Console.WriteLine(cTest.GetType().FullName);
    	Console.ReadLine();	
    }
}
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4  
ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS check values like p returned from a call like GetProperty() for != null before accessing their properties and calling methods on them! A-L-W-A-Y-S –  marc_s Aug 8 '09 at 8:33
    
an unasked for bit of advice: rename the variable CTest to cTest, _cTest, M_cTest or whatever naming convention for local variables you fancy. Now it is hard to determine whether a line like CTest.MyProp refers to a static property or an instance property. This is bound to cause hard to find bugs. –  Dabblernl Aug 8 '09 at 9:04
    
OK have renamed Ctest to ctest –  programmernovice Aug 8 '09 at 9:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

"test" is not a property, it's a field. You should use Type.GetField method to get a FieldInfo:

CTest CTest = new CTest();
Type t = CTest.GetType();
FieldInfo p = t.GetField("test");
CTest.test = "hello";
string test = (string)p.GetValue(CTest);

Console.WriteLine(CTest.GetType().FullName);
Console.ReadLine();
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Thanks didn't know about FieldInfo –  programmernovice Aug 8 '09 at 9:46

Others have observed that the member is a field. IMO, though, the best fix is to make it a property. Unless you're doing some very specific things, touching fields (from outside the class) is usually a bad idea:

public class CTest {
    public string test { get; set; }
}
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I thought that by default making the variable public would like have get and set. –  programmernovice Aug 8 '09 at 9:45
    
No; it if a public field unless you tell it to have a get/set. –  Marc Gravell Aug 8 '09 at 12:55

test is not a property, it is a member variable.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Reflection;


public class CTest {
    public string test;
    public string test2 {get; set;}
}

public class MyClass
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        CTest CTest = new CTest();
        Type t=CTest.GetType();
    	FieldInfo fieldTest = t.GetField("test");
        CTest.test = "hello";
    	string test = (string)fieldTest.GetValue(CTest);
    	Console.WriteLine(test);


        PropertyInfo p = t.GetProperty("test2");
        CTest.test2 = "hello2";
        //instruction below makes crash
        string test2 = (string)p.GetValue(CTest,null);
    	Console.WriteLine(test2);

        Console.ReadLine();     
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks have thumbed you up –  programmernovice Aug 8 '09 at 9:47

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