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I've heard about the Apriori algorithm several times before but never got the time or the opportunity to dig into it, can anyone explain to me in a simple way the workings of this algorithm? Also, a basic example would make it a lot easier for me to understand.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, I would assume you've read the wikipedia entry but you said "a basic example would make it a lot easier for me to understand". Wikipedia has just that so I'll assume you haven't read it and suggest that you do.

Read the wikipedia article.

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Thank you, actually I've read the wiki page before but it had really poor content at that time now it even contains a real world example! =) – Alix Axel Aug 8 '09 at 9:42

See Top 10 algorithms in data mining (free access) or The Top Ten Algorithms in Data Mining. The latter gives a detailed description of the algorithm, together with details on how to get optimized implementations.

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The best introduction to Apriori can be downloaded from this book:

http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~kumar/dmbook/index.php

you can download the chapter 6 for free which explain Apriori very clearly.

Moreover, if you want to download a Java version of Apriori and other algorithms for frequent itemset mining, you can check my website:

http://www.philippe-fournier-viger.com/spmf/

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Um... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apriori_algorithm

Wikipedia has a pretty simple explanation, and a nice example. It does require some basic knowledge of graph theory and basic algorithms on said graphs.

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