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I am creating a real estate app. I have a screen which displays a listing of all entries with a thumbnail and a little text on the side. These I have loaded from the server when the app launched. Each entry can have up to 5 photos, which I do not pre-load for obvious reasons. My issue is this… when the user selects an entry, the app downloads the larger photos from the server. Depending on circumstances this can take a few seconds. Right now the app just hangs for those few seconds. I don't know of any practical way to use an activity indicator in a list. A header space just seems like wasted space to use only to display"Loading…". Anyone have any ideas on what I can do to let the user know that loading is in progress?

Clarification: Once an entry is selected from the list, I load up another Table View Controller which has the photos in its list of selections. I currently load the photos in the ViewDidLoad using

NSData *myPhoto = [[NSData alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL URLWithString:myURL]];
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can:

  1. Use UIActivityIndicatorView to show a spinning activity indicator in the precise spot where the image will eventually be loaded.

  2. In a separate queue download the image. While the below code uses GCD, it's actually much better to use NSOperationQueue because on a slow network, using GCD can consume all of the available worker threads, detrimentally affecting performance on the app. A NSOperationQueue with a reasonable maxConcurrentOperationCount (such as 4 or 5) is much better.

  3. When the download is complete, dispatch the updating of the UI back to the main queue (e.g. turn off the activity indicator and set the image).

This is sample code from a gallery app that shows how you might do it. This is probably more complicated than you need and might be hard to repurpose via cut-and-paste, but the loadImage method shows the basic elements of the solution.

@interface MyImage : NSObject

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *urlString;
@property (nonatomic, strong) UIImageView *imageView;
@property (nonatomic, strong) UIActivityIndicatorView *activityIndicator;
@property (nonatomic, strong) UIView *view;
@property BOOL loading;
@property BOOL loaded;

@end

@implementation MyImage

// I find that I generally can get away with loading images in main queue using Documents
// cache, too, but if your images are not optimized (e.g. are large), or if you're supporting
// older, slower devices, you might not want to use the Documents cache in the main queue if
// you want a smooth UI. If this is the case, change kUseDocumentsCacheInMainQueue to NO and
// then use the Documents cache only in the background thread.

#define kUseDocumentsCacheInMainQueue NO

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self)
    {
        _view = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0.0, 0.0, IMAGE_WIDTH, IMAGE_HEIGHT)];
        _imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0.0, 0.0, IMAGE_WIDTH, IMAGE_HEIGHT)];
        _imageView.contentMode = UIViewContentModeScaleAspectFill;
        _imageView.clipsToBounds = YES;
        [_view addSubview:_imageView];
        _loading = NO;
        _loaded = NO;
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)loadImage:(dispatch_queue_t)queue
{
    if (self.loading)
        return;

    self.loading = YES;

    ThumbnailCache *cache = [ThumbnailCache sharedManager];

    if (self.imageView.image == nil)
    {
        // I've implemented a caching system that stores images in my Documents folder
        // as well as, for optimal performance, a NSCache subclass. Whether you go through
        // this extra work is up to you

        UIImage *imageFromCache = [cache objectForKey:self.urlString useDocumentsCache:kUseDocumentsCacheInMainQueue];
        if (imageFromCache)
        {
            if (self.activityIndicator)
            {
                [self.activityIndicator stopAnimating];
                self.activityIndicator = nil;
            }

            self.imageView.image = imageFromCache;
            self.loading = NO;
            self.loaded = YES;
            return;
        }

        // assuming we haven't found it in my cache, then let's see if we need to fire
        // up the spinning UIActivityIndicatorView

        if (self.activityIndicator == nil)
        {
            self.activityIndicator = [[UIActivityIndicatorView alloc] initWithActivityIndicatorStyle:UIActivityIndicatorViewStyleGray];
            self.activityIndicator.center = CGPointMake(self.view.frame.size.width / 2.0, self.view.frame.size.height / 2.0);
            [self.view addSubview:self.activityIndicator];
        }
        [self.activityIndicator startAnimating];

        // now, in the background queue, let's retrieve the image

        dispatch_async(queue, ^{
            if (self.loading)
            {
                UIImage *image = nil;

                // only requery cache for Documents cache if we didn't do so in the main 
                // queue for small images, doing it in the main queue is fine, but apps 
                // with larger images, you might do this in this background queue.

                if (!kUseDocumentsCacheInMainQueue)
                    image = [cache objectForKey:self.urlString useDocumentsCache:YES];

                // if we haven't gotten the image yet, retrieve it from the remote server

                if (!image)
                {
                    NSData *data = [[NSData alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL URLWithString:self.urlString]];

                    if (data)
                    {
                        image = [UIImage imageWithData:data];

                        // personally, I cache my image to optimize future access ... you might just store in the Documents folder, or whatever

                        [cache setObject:image forKey:self.urlString data:data]; 
                    }
                }

                // now update the UI in the main queue

                dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
                    if (self.loading)
                    {
                        [self.activityIndicator stopAnimating];
                        self.activityIndicator = nil;
                        self.imageView.image = image;
                        self.loading = NO;
                        self.loaded = YES;
                    }
                });
            }
        });
    }
}

// In my gallery view controller, I make sure to unload images that have scrolled off
// the screen. And because I've cached the images, I can re-retrieve them fairly quickly.
// This sort of logic is critical if you're dealing with *lots* of images and you want 
// to be responsible with your memory.

- (void)unloadImage
{
    // remove from imageview, but not cache

    self.imageView.image = nil;

    self.loaded = NO;
    self.loading = NO;
}

@end

By the way, if the image you're downloading is in a UIImageView in a UITableViewCell the final update back to the table might want to do something about checking to see if the cell is still on screen (to make sure it wasn't dequeued because the UITableViewCell scrolled off the screen). In that case, the final UI update after successful download of the image might do something like:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{

    // if the cell is visible, then set the image

    UITableViewCell *cell = [self.tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath];
    if (cell)
    {
        cell.imageView.image = image;
    }
});

Note, this is using the UITableView method cellForRowAtIndexPath, which should not be confused with the UITableViewController method tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath.

share|improve this answer
    
shouldn't you use dispatch_sync instead of dispatch_async to update the UI in the main queue? –  Moxy Sep 18 '12 at 20:08
    
@Moxy No, I don't think so. In ARC, at least, the object will be retained until the dispatched block of code completes (so you don't have to worry about that) and there's nothing in this secondary queue that is conditional on waiting for the foreground update to take place. And if I don't need dispatch_sync, I always use dispatch_async, to free up the background queue. –  Rob Sep 18 '12 at 20:16
    
Thanks for reply. I pre load my photos upon the user selecting the entry from the list. I am not sure how I can implement your code as I currently have it. Remember, once the entry is selected, a new TableViewController is loaded which displays additional items - one of those being the option to view the photos. –  sangony Sep 18 '12 at 20:29
1  
@sangony Agreed. Might be hard to repurpose this code directly. But I just wanted to show a practical implementation of the conceptual design I suggested. Note, the UIActivityIndicatorView is useful to show in lieu of the image, but if you haven't even gotten to the point of showing the user that, you could alternatively use the network activity indicator in the iOS status bar at the top (next to the network signal strength) via [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible. It's just a matter of where you want to show the user that network activity is in progress. –  Rob Sep 18 '12 at 20:39
    
Wow. I never even considered using the network activity indicator. That's a great suggestion. I think I will do a little re-write on my code to load once the user gets to the actual photo displays. Thanks. –  sangony Sep 18 '12 at 21:05

For one of my projects i used this custom class for UIImageView: https://github.com/nicklockwood/AsyncImageView

Small tutorial is located here: http://www.markj.net/iphone-asynchronous-table-image/

With just few lines of code i managed to implement asynchronous loading of images, caching etc. Just give it a look.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply Sebastian. The tutorial is pretty good. I have most the issues already in place except for what I asked. In this case Rob's answer is simple and the right fit. –  sangony Sep 18 '12 at 21:08

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