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Today I was messing around with malloc and integer pointer. The program is setup so it allocates a memory location to an integer pointer and then fills the memory location with bunch of integers like an array and then print all the integers. The problem is when ever it finishes running it crashes. And I suspect that malloc is causing the issue.

Here is the code

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main(){

    int *name,x;
    char y;
    name=malloc(sizeof(int));
    for(x=0;x<500;x++){
        name[x]=x;
    }
    for(x=0;x<500;x++){
        printf("%d ",name[x]);
    }

    scanf("%c",&y);
    free(name);
    return 0;
}

please help. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I bet it isn't malloc, but rather name[x] = .. –  user166390 Sep 18 '12 at 20:09
    
If on Linux, learn to compile with gcc -Wall -g and to debug with gdb and valgrind (and sometimes also strace or ltrace). –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 18 '12 at 20:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are allocating memory to store only one int. What you need is:

name=malloc(500*sizeof(int));

share|improve this answer
name = malloc(sizeof(int));

is the problem. That way you can store only one int in the array. Try

name = malloc(sizeof(int) * 500);

instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Then may I ask why is it printing all 500 integers? And is there any other way of going about doing this without a specific number in the malloc statement? –  Icarus Sep 18 '12 at 20:12
    
@Anj17 - a specific number in the malloc statement is not a good idea. Look at my response below. –  paulsm4 Sep 18 '12 at 20:15
    
@Anj17 it's printing all the numbers because it invokes undefined behavior. UB doesn't mean it must crash, it means it can crash and do anything else. And no, you have to malloc exactly sizeof(int) * num bytes explicitly if you want to store num integers. –  user529758 Sep 18 '12 at 20:16
    
@Anj17: you're writing off the end of the array. This can (and does) cause unpredictable behavior, including corrupting other objects, the stack, who knows what else. Sounds like all goes well until free. –  Keith Randall Sep 18 '12 at 20:16
    
@paulsm4 you're using a specific number for mallocation :) You just make sure it's always the same as the number of items you want to store. There is a slight difference... –  user529758 Sep 18 '12 at 20:17

Uh, "malloc()" isn't crashing your program.

You're crashing your program :)

SUGGESTIONS:

  1. Check for "name=malloc()" returning NULL (i.e. check for errors).

  2. Don't allocate space for 1 int ("sizeof(int)" is probably four bytes), then try to write 500 ints :)

  3. Don't litter your code with "magic numbers" like "500" - use a constant instead.

SUGGESTED CHANGES:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define NELMS 500

int main(){

    int *name = NULL,x;
    char y;
    name=malloc(sizeof(int) * NELMS);
    if (!name) {
      perror ("Unable to allocate memory!");
      return 1;
    }
    for(x=0;x<NELMS;x++){
        name[x]=x;
    }
    for(x=0;x<NELMS;x++){
        printf("%d ",name[x]);
    }

    scanf("%c",&y);
    free(name);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, checking the return of malloc is very important. Some times no memory may be available, or malloc cannot get to it for some reason. –  fooOnYou Sep 18 '12 at 20:14
    
Actually, not OP is crashing the program, but rather the kernel :) –  user529758 Sep 18 '12 at 20:46
    
Q: Isn't that a bit like saying your bumper caused the crash if you steer into a brick wall and floor the accelerator? Just askin' ;) –  paulsm4 Sep 18 '12 at 22:17

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