Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When handling exceptions in TPL tasks I have come across two ways to handle exceptions. The first catches the exception within the task and returns it within the result like so:

var task = Task<Exception>.Factory.StartNew(
    () =>
        {
            try
            {
                // Do Something

                return null;
            }
            catch (System.Exception e)
            {
                return e;
            }
        });

task.ContinueWith(
    r =>
        {
            if (r.Result != null)
            {
                // Handle Exception
            }
        });

The second is the one shown within the documentation and I guess the proper way to do things:

var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(
    () =>
        {
            // Do Something
        });
task.ContinueWith(
    r =>
        {
            if (r.Exception != null)
            {
                // Handle Aggregate Exception
                r.Exception.Handle(y => true);
            }
        });

I am wondering if there is anything wrong with the first approach? I have received 'unhandled aggregate exception' exceptions every now and again using this technique and was wondering how this can happen?

To clarify, I think the second pattern is the better one but I have a chunk of code which makes use of the first pattern and I am trying to find out if it needs re-factoring i.e. if it turns out that not all exceptions will be trapped.

share|improve this question
    
I had the same issue, although I checked with task.IsFaulted, I found that if it had an exception during the task, even if the first thing I did was check for that, and noted it and give up, it still caused issues.. and I got a exceptions leaking out that shouldnt have.. –  BugFinder Sep 20 '12 at 10:27
add comment

1 Answer 1

The first approach assumes exceptions will be raised for every invocation. While this might be true, the exceptions don't seem "exceptional" and smells of a design issue. If the exceptions are not exceptional, then the result doesn't make much sense. The other problem is that if you do want a "result" (i.e. something other than Exception) you can't because the one and only Result slot is used for an Exception. Another problem is that you don't get the re-throwing of the exception back on the main thread (you could do that manually) so you don't get the catch semantics (i.e. you're using the Handle method).

The second method will be better understood by more people.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comments. I am using this approach within a repository where exceptions are expected (database access).If I need a result returned I have a RepositoryResult class which can be returned by the task and contains the result and the exception. The task continuation is where the exception handling is taking place (i.e. call to the exception handling service). What I am really wondering is how I can end up with an unhandled aggregate exception with the first approach? –  user1680766 Sep 20 '12 at 13:45
    
So, you'd have inconsistent ways of dealing with exceptions. Not that Task has a consistent way with Task<T> due to lack of a Result property but there is already a Task.Exception property as well as IsFaulted... –  Peter Ritchie Sep 20 '12 at 13:48
    
I agree, the second approach is the better one. Unfortunately I have taken on some code which makes heavy use of the first pattern and now I need to decide if it is necessary to go back and re factor it - hence the question if the first pattern can lead to unhandled aggregate exceptions. –  user1680766 Sep 21 '12 at 6:30
    
I think the second approach is more maintainable; but, if the other code works, there may be no reason to refactor it. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 21 '12 at 15:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.