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Hey all i have a question and an answer, but i cant understand the second part of the answer! Could any1 here please help me out?

Here it is:

Question;

A computer has 32-bit virtual addresses and 4-K.B pages. The program and data toget­her fit in the lowest page (0-4095) The stack fits in the highest page. How many en­tries are needed in the page table if traditional (one-level) paging is used? How many page table entries are needed for two-level paging, with 10 bits in each part?

Answer;

For a one-level page table, there are 2^32 /2^12 or 1M pages needed. Thus the page table must have 1M entries. For two-level paging, the main page table has 1K entries, each of which points to a second page table. Only two of these are used. Thus in total only three page table entries are needed, one in the top-level table and one in each of the lower-level tables.

I cant understand the bolded. for example i cant understand how this 1K comes up.

Thanks for your time,

Cheers!

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10 bits in each part = 2^10 entries = 1024 entries = 1K entries – Greg Hewgill Sep 18 '12 at 22:04
    
Ok i got this part. then it says "each of which points to a second page table.Only two of these are used.Thus in total only three page table entries are needed, one in the top-level table and one in each of the lower-level tables." Why only two of these used (these what? entries?) I cant understand this at all. – John Lars Sep 18 '12 at 22:09
    
alright now it seems that i cnt understand the correlation between pages number and entries on pages . Anyone ? – John Lars Sep 18 '12 at 22:29
1  
And I really wonder what is so difficult with arrays/tables and their indexing for this kind of question to be asked over and over again. Besides, there are so many books and web pages describing all this page translation stuff. – Alexey Frunze Sep 19 '12 at 0:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think, the answer to the first part of the question is wrong because you are not using the context of the question: The program and data toget­her fit in the lowest page (0-4095) The stack fits in the highest page. So, while the total number of page table entries is 1048576, of those you only use 2 entries, one for each of those 2 pages (entry 0 points at the code/data page and entry 1048575 points at the stack page).

For the second part of the question you're given an extremely useful hint: two-level paging, with 10 bits in each part. But first, let's go back to the above, simpler case...

In case 1 with one page table, virtual addresses:

  1. have 32 bits (given as A computer has 32-bit virtual addresses)
  2. their 12 least significant bits indicate a location within a page (given as A computer has ... 4-K.B pages, also as fit in the lowest page (0-4095))

The remaining 20 most significant bits obviously select an entry in the page table. The selected page table entry contains the physical address of the page.

So, the virtual addresses look like this:

most significant bits                            least significant bits
| 20 bits = index into the page table | 12 bits = index into the page |

Hence, the CPU uses this formula to access memory:

PhysicalAddress = PageTable[VirtualAddress / 4096] + VirtualAddress modulo 4096

Now, let's get back to case 2.

You still have the 12 LSB bits to select a byte in the page.

But What's new? It's two-level paging, with 10 bits in each part.

Those 10 bits are the lengths of page table indices, which you now have two.

With this we arrive at the following break-down for virtual addresses:

most significant bits                       least significant bits
| 10 bits = PT index | 10 bits = PT index | 12 bits = page index |

And the address translating formula, naturally, is:

PhysAddr = PageTable[VirtAddr / (1024*4096)][(VirtAddr / 4096) modulo 1024] + VirtAddr modulo 4096

Now, we still have the same program that occupies 2 pages.

The virtual addresses pointing at the code/data page are (in binary):

0000000000|0000000000|xxxxxxxxxxxx

And the virtual addresses pointing at the stack page are (in binary as well):

1111111111|1111111111|xxxxxxxxxxxx

From this you can see that you are using 2 different page table entries at level 1 (selected by indices 0000000000 and 1111111111) and similarly 2 different page table entries at level 2.

So, in case 2 the total is 2+2=4 page table entries needed for the program to operate.

P.S. in case you don't remember: 210 = 1024, 212 = 4096, 220 = 1048576.

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