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I have a csv reader that pulls data values into a list, once this data has been put into a list I would like to strip the whitespace in the list. I have looked online and seen people using striplist()

e.g

def striplist(l):
    return([x.strip() for x in l])

However, being a novice and attempting to incorporate the code, I'm not having much luck, guidance on the issue or some understanding about what I'm doing wrong would be greatly appreciated. My code is below:

import csv

import time

csvfile = open("example.csv")

filetype = csv.Sniffer().has_header(csvfile.read(1024))

csvfile.seek(0)

reader = csv.reader(csvfile,filetype)

csvreaderlist = []

csvfilecounter = 0


if filetype:
    next(reader)
    print("CSV file located, headers present, importing data")
    time.sleep(3)
    for data in reader:
            csvreaderlist.append(data)
            print(data)
            csvfilecounter = csvfilecounter +1
            summarycounter = summarycounter +1

else:
    print("CSV file located, no headers found, importing data")
    time.sleep(3)
    for data in reader:
            csvreaderlist.append(data)
            csvfilecounter = csvfilecounter +1
            summarycounter = summarycounter +1
            print(data)

if csvfilecounter == csvfilecounter:
    print(len(csvreaderlist),'Lines were successfully imported from the CSV file')
    time.sleep(3)
def striplist(csvreaderlist):
    return([data.strip() for data in csvreaderlist])
share|improve this question
1  
what error are you encountering? remember to define your function above the code that calls it. or use the if "name == main" idiom –  Corey Goldberg Sep 18 '12 at 22:28
    
Hi Corey, that is part of my issue, i was not receiving an error and the list remained with whitespace. –  Hoyhoy Sep 20 '12 at 20:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I understand the question properly, you're asking where you should apply your strip_list function in order for the CSV data you're importing to all be stripped strings. The key place is where you have the "data" list, which you get from the CSV reader. That will always be a list of strings, and so you can pass it to your strip_list function before appending it to the results array.

By the way, you've currently duplicated the core part of your CSV reading loop in the two branches of your if statement. That is unnecessary. Here's how you can do it without the duplication:

if filetype:
    next(reader)
    print("CSV file located, headers present, importing data")
else:
    print("CSV file located, no headers found, importing data")

time.sleep(3)

for data in reader:
        csvreaderlist.append(strip_list(data)) # do stripping here!
        csvfilecounter = csvfilecounter +1
        summarycounter = summarycounter +1

Note that you need to move the definition of strip_list somewhere above this code, if you're going to be running it at module level (rather than as part of a function).

By the way, you're currently passing True or False (the return value of csv.Sniffer().has_header()) as the dialect parameter of your Reader. That's probably not what you want to do. Instead, you need separate variables for dialect and has_header:

csvfile = open("example.csv")
top = csvfile.read(1024)
csvfile.seek(0)

sniffer = csv.Sniffer()

dialect = sniffer.sniff(top)
has_header = sniffer.had_header(top)

reader = csv.reader(csvfile, dialect)
if has_header:
    next(reader)
share|improve this answer
    
hello, yes that is correct i'm looking at placement and if there are any glaring errors in my poorly written code :-) thank you for pointing out my duplications and offering solutions to these, I will review my code and incorporate the suggested changes. I understand that I really need to read up inaddition to hacking away at code. Lastly your dialect comment, what is dialect used for primarily? Apologies if this is a ridiculous Q. Thank you for taking the time to answer my question so thoroughly. –  Hoyhoy Sep 20 '12 at 20:27
    
The dialect parameter to csv.reader describes how rows and columns are delimited in your CSV file. If you know the format in advance, you can skip detecting it with csv.Sniffer (which is not always going to get it right) and simply provide the correct delimiters instead. I suggest reading the csv module's documentation for more details. –  Blckknght Sep 20 '12 at 23:02

an example of your function:

def strip_list(the_list):
    return [line.strip() for line in the_list]

lines = ['foo\n', 'bar\r\n', 'baz']
stripped_list = strip_list(lines)
print(stripped_list)

would output:

['foo', 'bar', 'baz']

and here as an ugly memory inefficient one-liner, just to show using splitlines() :)

return ''.join(csvreaderlist).splitlines()
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