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Suppose we have expression g=(a+b)*(c+d)-(e/f) with hard-coded arbitrary numbers for variables. I would like to calculate this expression using multiple child processes in order to better understand how fork() works.

My first attempt was to calculate (a + b) on child pid1, (c + d) on child pid2, (e / f) on child pid3, and then do summation & subtraction in the parent process.

Well, to my disappointment, (a + b) calculation done in the child process pid1 did not affect double expression1 variable in the parent process. I think the reason behind that - each fork() creates a separate memory space; as soon as a child process exits, all calculations done in that child process are gone.

What do you usually do in a situation like this? I thought maybe I could nest fork() child process within a child process to calculate (a + b) first; wait; then (c + d); wait; (e / f); wait; the first child calculates the entire expression; child return(0); parent terminates.

But I think there's an easier solution to this problem, am I right?

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6  
Welcome to the wonderful world of IPC — Inter-Process Communication. Your analysis that each process has a separate address space is correct. You will have to decide how to get each sub-process to communicate with the relevant others. You could use shared memory, pipes, or a variety of other techniques. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 18 '12 at 22:33
5  
The usual technique for this sort of parallelism is multi-threading, not multi-processing. All threads share the same address space. –  Kerrek SB Sep 18 '12 at 22:34
    
Kerrek SB; Jonathan: Thanks! –  Twilight Pony Inc. Sep 18 '12 at 22:35
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you insist on using fork() , so here is my answer now using child process and shared memory

Note that exit() is used here the way it is expected by the system: to signalize if the child has exited normally or not.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/ipc.h>
#include <sys/shm.h>


struct shared{
    int a_b;
    int c_d;
    int e_f;
};
const int a=1,b=2,c=3,d=4,e=6,f=2;
const key_t key = 1234;
pid_t pab,pcd,pef;
void* shared_mem;

int main(){
    //Parent process create the shared memory 
    int shmid = shmget(key,sizeof(struct shared), 0666|IPC_CREAT);
    if(shmid == -1) exit(EXIT_FAILURE);

    //Fork child
    pab = fork();
    if(pab == 0){  
        //Inside process ab
        //attach to shared memory
        shared_mem = shmat(shmid,(void*) 0,0);
        if(shared_mem == (void*) -1) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
        struct shared* shared_data = (struct shared*) shared_mem;
        shared_data->a_b = a +b;

        //detach
        if(shmdt(shared_mem) == -1) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }else {
        pcd = fork();
        if(pcd == 0){
            //Inside process cd
            //attach to shared memory
            shared_mem = shmat(shmid,(void*) 0,0);
            if(shared_mem == (void*) -1) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
            struct shared* shared_data = (struct shared*) shared_mem;
            shared_data->c_d = c+d;

            //detach
            if(shmdt(shared_mem) == -1) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
            exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);

        }else{
            pef = fork();
            if(pef == 0){
                //Inside process ef
                //attach to shared memory
                shared_mem = shmat(shmid,(void*) 0,0);
                if(shared_mem == (void*) -1) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
                struct shared* shared_data = (struct shared*) shared_mem;
                shared_data->e_f = e/f;

                //detach
                if(shmdt(shared_mem) == -1) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);

                exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
            }
        }
    }

    //Wait child process termination
    int status_ab,status_cd,status_ef;
    waitpid(pab,&status_ab,0);
    waitpid(pcd,&status_cd,0);
    waitpid(pef,&status_ef,0);

    //Check if all child exited  normally
    if(!WIFEXITED(status_ab) || !WIFEXITED(status_cd)||!WIFEXITED(status_ef)){
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    //Parent attaches to memory 
    shared_mem = shmat(shmid,(void*) 0,0);
    if(shared_mem == (void*) -1) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
    struct shared* shared_data = (struct shared*) shared_mem;

    //Calculate result
    int result = (shared_data->a_b)*(shared_data->c_d)-(shared_data->e_f);
    printf("Result is %d\n", result);

    //Parent detaches from shared memory and deletes
    if(shmdt(shared_mem) == -1) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
    if(shmctl(shmid,IPC_RMID,0) == -1) exit(EXIT_FAILURE);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;

}
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fork()ing the processes, then waitpid()ing on their return values:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
    //whatever values you like:
    int a = 1;
    int b = 2;
    int c = 3;
    int d = 4;
    int e = 15;
    int f = 6;

    int a_plus_b_pid;
    int c_plus_d_pid;
    int e_div_f_pid;

    int a_plus_b;
    int c_plus_d;
    int e_div_f;

    a_plus_b_pid = fork();
    if(a_plus_b_pid)
    {
        c_plus_d_pid = fork();
        if(c_plus_d_pid)
        {
            e_div_f_pid = fork();
            if (e_div_f_pid)
            {
                //wait for our processes to exit, with our results, and stash the computed values.
                waitpid(a_plus_b_pid, &a_plus_b, 0);
                waitpid(c_plus_d_pid, &c_plus_d, 0);
                waitpid(e_div_f_pid, &e_div_f, 0);

                //The 8 least-significant bits carry info that we're not interested in here, so shift them out:
                a_plus_b >>= 8;
                c_plus_d >>= 8;
                e_div_f >>= 8;

                printf("%d %d %d %d\n", a_plus_b, c_plus_d, e_div_f, a_plus_b * c_plus_d - e_div_f);
            }
            else
            {
                exit (e/f);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            exit (c+d);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        exit (a+b);
    }
}
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I do not think it is a good idea to use something in a different way that it was designed for. If you call exit() with a number different of zero, you are signalizing to the OS that your program failed. On the other hand, you won't be able to tell that the value returned by the child is the result of the subexpression or an error code. If you need to do IPC, use a real IPC mechanism. –  André Oriani Sep 19 '12 at 1:29
    
I would suggest to use popen in that case. It gives a simple IPC enough for your needs. –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 19 '12 at 5:41
    
The interpretation of exit is not defined. The OS does not impose any meaning upon its value - it is simply by convention that 0 is a normal exit (since it is assumed that there is only one good way to finish) and anything else is abnormal (since there are any number of ways to fail.) Regardless, it it hardly applicable here, since the OP was explicit that the question was academic. –  Sniggerfardimungus Sep 19 '12 at 18:30
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This is a version using pthreads:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>


volatile int a_b;
volatile int c_d;
volatile int e_f;
const int a=1,b=2,c=3,d=4,e=6,f=2;

void* calc_ab(void*);
void* calc_cd(void*);
void* calc_ef(void*);

int main(){
        pthread_t ab_thread, cd_thread, ef_thread;

        pthread_create(&ab_thread,NULL,calc_ab,NULL);
        pthread_create(&cd_thread,NULL,calc_cd,NULL);
        pthread_create(&ef_thread,NULL,calc_ef,NULL);
        pthread_join(ab_thread, NULL);
        pthread_join(cd_thread, NULL);
        pthread_join(ef_thread,NULL);
        int result = a_b*c_d-e_f;
        printf("Result is %d\n", result);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

void* calc_ab(void* arg){ a_b = a+b;pthread_exit(NULL);}
void* calc_cd(void* arg){ c_d = c+d;pthread_exit(NULL);}
void* calc_ef(void* arg){ e_f = e/f;pthread_exit(NULL);}

To compile you have to link against pthread: gcc pthread.c -lpthread -o teste

Notes

  • Note that variables that are shared between the main thread and a child thread are declared volatile. This prevent the compiler of doing some memory optimizations that could prevent a write done in one thread not to be seen by others.
  • Each child thread writes to a different shared variable. I wanted to keep the code simple, not having to handle synchronization explicitly.
  • The main thread only reads the shared variable only after it has returned from a pthread_join for the thread that changed it. Again I wanted to keep the code simple, not having to handle synchronization explicitly.
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First, you don't need processes at all to do arbitrary computation. Emabedding an interpreter like e.g. lua might be simpler.

Of course, each process has its own address space. Type cat /proc/self/maps to get information about the process running that cat command.

If you insist on using processes to learn how they can communicate thru pipes, you might use something like popen(3) which will use some syscalls to start and pipe a command.

char cmd[80];
int a, b, sum;
/// fill a & b
snprintf (cmd, sizeof(cmd), "echo $[%d + %d]", a, b);
FILE* pcmd = popen(cmd, "r");
if (fscanf (pcmd, "%d", &sum)>0) {
    // do something with sum
};
pclose(pcmd);

And you should read a good book like Advanced Unix Programming and Advanced Linux Programming. The real thing is to understand syscalls like fork(2), waitpid(2), execve(2), pipe(2), dup(2), etc.... To understand what syscalls(2) are done by some command or program, use strace

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