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So let me give you a rundown of what everything is:

  • the first section just gets a drives size information

  • Sizer is a class that returns an array

  • The arrays contains (size converted to 4 digits,size label, raw size) I pasted the code at the bottom for better understanding

  • The labels are just labels that will show you the size

Now, I just know deep inside that there is a more efficient way of doing this and I an having a brain fart and can't figure it out. There has got to be a way to do this with a loop or is this really the best way to get this done?

private void driveList_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            DriveInfo wow = therehasgottobeanotherway[driveList.SelectedIndex];
            if (wow.IsReady)
            {
                //get drive sizes
                long tot = wow.TotalSize;
                long free = wow.TotalFreeSpace;
                long aval = wow.AvailableFreeSpace;

                sizer totSize = new sizer(tot);
                sizer freeSize = new sizer(free);
                sizer avalSize = new sizer(aval);

                String[] tots = totSize.getSizeStringType();
                String[] frees = freeSize.getSizeStringType();
                String[] avals = avalSize.getSizeStringType();

                totalSizeLabel.Text = tots[0] + tots[1];
                freeSizeLabel.Text = frees[0] + frees[1];
                avalSizeLabel.Text = avals[0] + avals[1];

                driveName.Text = wow.VolumeLabel;
            }
            else
            {
                driveName.Text = "Drive Not Ready";
            }
        }




using System;

namespace compy
{
    internal class sizer
    {
        private long fSize;
        private String[] fSizer = new String[3];

        public sizer(long fs)
        { fSize = fs; }

        public String[] getSizeStringType()
        {
            fSizer[2] = Convert.ToString(fSize);

            if (fSize > 0 && fSize < 1024)
            {
                fSizer[0] = Convert.ToString(fSize);
                fSizer[1] = " Bytes";
            }
            else if (fSize > 1024 && fSize < 1048576)
            {
                fSizer[0] = Convert.ToString(fSize / 1000);
                fSizer[1] = " Kilobytes";
            }
            else if (fSize > 1048576 && fSize < 1073741824)
            {
                fSizer[0] = Convert.ToString(fSize / 1000 / 1000);
                fSizer[1] = " Megabytes";
            }
            else if (fSize > 1073741824 && fSize < 1099511627776)
            {
                fSizer[0] = Convert.ToString(fSize / 1000 / 1000 / 1000);
                fSizer[1] = " Gigabytes";
            }
            else if (fSize > 1099511627776 && fSize < 1.1259e15)
            {
                fSizer[0] = Convert.ToString(fSize / 1000 / 1000 / 1000);
                fSizer[1] = " Terabyte";
            }

            return fSizer;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
looks about as appropriate as it can get all things considered... –  dylansweb Sep 19 '12 at 2:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What makes you think it needs optimization...does it run slow? Don't mess up readable code to make it run insignificantly faster.

If you want to improve the code, changes lines like this:

else if (fSize > 1048576 && fSize < 1073741824)

to this:

else if (fSize > 0x100000 && fSize < 0x40000000)

PS: Are you sure your numbers are correct?

share|improve this answer
    
Ha. It's just the way I am, I sometimes like my code to look good IF I can get it too. Can you explain the changes that you made? I've seen those symbols before but I've never used them. –  Sempus Sep 19 '12 at 2:28
    
They indicate hexadecimal numbers and for some values they are much better for readers of your code to understand what you are doing: 0x1000 = 4096 –  Steve Wellens Sep 19 '12 at 2:38
    
Would it still work for the division by 1000? So I could just them in a shorter form? –  Sempus Sep 19 '12 at 2:45
    
I'm not sure what you mean. The underlying values will be the same, and you can do math with them. The visual representation that readers of your code see should make what you are doing more obvious. –  Steve Wellens Sep 19 '12 at 12:08

You could make Sizer a static class and make getSizeStringType() a static method. Then pass in long fSize as an argument.

So driveList_SelectedIndexChanged would look something like this:

        DriveInfo wow = therehasgottobeanotherway[driveList.SelectedIndex];
        if (wow.IsReady)
        {
            String[] tots = sizer.getSizeStringType(wow.TotalSize);
            String[] frees = sizer.getSizeStringType(wow.TotalFreeSpace);
            String[] avals = sizer.getSizeStringType(wow.AvailableFreeSpace);

            totalSizeLabel.Text = tots[0] + tots[1];
            freeSizeLabel.Text = frees[0] + frees[1];
            avalSizeLabel.Text = avals[0] + avals[1];

            driveName.Text = wow.VolumeLabel;
        }
        else
        {
            driveName.Text = "Drive Not Ready";
        }

Aside from that, instead of using arrays in the sizer, you could make a third class that stores the 4 digits, label and raw size. Then the getSizeStringType() method could return an instance of this class instead of an array. That would make things a little less messy but will require more code. But in the end, your asking opinions here.

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first of all, your condition is not closed region such as the size is just 1024, 1048576...

there is a loop method but is not a more efficient way

        String[] aStrSizeUnit = new String[] { " Bytes", " Kilobytes", " Megabytes", " Gigabytes", " Terabyte" };
        int iSizeLevel = 0;
        long iSizeTmp = (long)fSize;
        fSizer[2] = Convert.ToString(fSize);

        while (iSizeTmp > 0)
        {
            fSizer[0] = Convert.ToString(fSize / Math.Pow(1000 , iSizeLevel));
            fSizer[1] = aStrSizeUnit[iSizeLevel];
            iSizeTmp /= 1024;
            iSizeLevel++;
        }
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