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I am participating in Harvard's opencourse ware and attempting the homework questions. I wrote (or tried to) write a program in C to sort an array using bubble sort implementation. After I finished it, I tested it with an array of size 5, then 6 then 3 etc. All worked. then, I tried to test it with an array of size 11, and then that's when it started bugging out. The program was written to stop getting numbers for the array after it hits the array size entered by the user. But, when I tested it with array size 11 it would continuously try to get more values from the user, past the size declared. It did that to me consistently for a couple days, then the third day I tried to initialize the array size variable to 0, then all of a sudden it would continue to have the same issues with an array size of 4 or more. I un-did the initialization and it continues to do the same thing for an array size of over 4. I cant figure out why the program would work for some array sizes and not others. I used main to get the array size and values from the keyboard, then I passed it to a function I wrote called sort. Note that this is not homework or anything I need to get credit, It is solely for learning. Any comments will be very much appreciated. Thanks.

/**************************************************************************** 
 * helpers.c
 *
 * Computer Science 50
 * Problem Set 3
 *
 * Helper functions for Problem Set 3.
 ***************************************************************************/

#include <cs50.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#include "helpers.h"

void 
sort(int values[], int n);

int main(){

    printf("Please enter the size of the array \n");
    int num = GetInt();
    int mystack[num];
    for (int z=0; z < num; z++){
        mystack[z] = GetInt();
    }

    sort(mystack, num);
}


/*
 * Sorts array of n values.
 */

void 
sort(int values[], int n)
{
    // this is a bubble sort implementation
    bool swapped = false; // initialize variable to check if swap was made

    for (int i=0; i < (n-1);){ // loops through all array values

        if (values[i + 1] > values [i]){ // checks the neighbor to see if it's bigger
            i++; // if bigger do nothing except to move to the next value in the array
        }
        else{ // if neighbor is not bigger then out of order and needs sorting
            int temp = values[i]; // store current array value in temp variable for swapping purposes
            values[i] = values[i+1]; //swap with neighbor
            values[i+1] = temp; // swap neighbor to current array value
            swapped = true; // keep track that swap was made
            i++;
       }

       // if we are at the end of array and swap was made then go back to beginning
       // and start process again.
       if((i == (n-1) && (swapped == true))){ 
           i = 0;
           swapped = false;
       }

       // if we are at the end and swap was not made then array must be in order so print it
       if((i == (n-1) && (swapped == false))){
           for (int y =0; y < n; y++){
                printf("%d", values[y]);
           }
           // exit program
           break; 
       }

   } // end for

   // return;
}
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Is this C code? If so does it really run ok? I'm looking at this line: int mystack[num]; And thinking this can't work because a constant value is required for the dimension in a declaration of a static array. Also please provide the code for the GetInt() function –  Mike Sep 19 '12 at 3:38
    
Post GetInt, smells fishy. –  nneonneo Sep 19 '12 at 3:44
    
It's not necessary to post GetInt(); the code could print out the number that it returns, each time it returns one. You could do that by creating and calling a local function — perhaps get_int() — which calls GetInt() and prints the returned value. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 19 '12 at 3:49
6  
@Mike: the code uses C99 and VLAs (variable length arrays). Fully standardized, but not supported by MSVC. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 19 '12 at 3:49
    
For whatever it is worth, with a semi-sane implementation of GetInt(), your code seems to work OK. I tested it on various sizes of array (using GCC 4.7.1 on Mac OS X 10.7.4). Your loop structure in your sort() function is unorthodox; setting the loop control variable back to zero as you do is not the clearest way of writing nested loops. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 19 '12 at 5:07

3 Answers 3

You can easily use 2 nested for loops :

int i, j, temp ;
for ( i = 0 ; i < n - 1 ; i++ )
{
    for ( j = 0 ; j <= n - 2 - i ; j++ )
    {
        if ( arr[j] > arr[j + 1] )
        {
            temp = arr[j] ;
            arr[j] = arr[j + 1] ;
            arr[j + 1] = temp ;
        }
    }
}

also you should now it's a c++ code not a c, because c doesn't have something like :

int mystack[num];

and you should enter a number when you're creating an array and you can't use a variable (like "int num" in your code). This is in C, but in C++ you're doing right.

share|improve this answer
1  
Please learn about the old version of the C standard, C99, which allows precisely constructs such as int mystack[num]; and declarations in loops, and declarations interspersed with other statements. The fact that one major C compiler, MSVC, still only suports the really old standard (C89) instead of C99 is not a reason to claim that valid C code is something else. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 19 '12 at 4:36
    
i'm sorry. you're right Jonathan –  Kozet Sep 19 '12 at 5:13

The first thing to do when debugging a problem like this is ensure that the computer is seeing the data you think it should be seeing. You do that by printing out the data as it is entered. You're having trouble with the inputs; print out what the computer is seeing:

static void dump_array(FILE *fp, const char *tag, const int *array, int size)
{
    fprintf(fp, "Array %s (%d items)\n", tag, size);
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        fprintf(fp, "  %d: %d\n", i, array[i]);
}

int main(void)
{
    printf("Please enter the size of the array \n");
    int num = GetInt();
    printf("num = %d\n", num);
    int mystack[num];
    for (int z = 0; z < num; z++)
    {
        mystack[z] = GetInt();
        printf("%d: %d\n", z, mystack[z]);
    }

    dump_array(stdout, "Before", mystack, num);
    sort(mystack, num);
    dump_array(stdout, "After", mystack, num);
}

This will give you direct indications of what is being entered as it is entered, which will probably help you recognize what is going wrong. Printing out inputs is a very basic debugging technique.

Also, stylistically, having a function that should be called sort_array_and_print() suggests that you do not have the correct division of labour; the sort code should sort, and a separate function (like the dump_array() function I showed) should be used for printing an array.

share|improve this answer
    
I printed the values in the array for main, and that worked as expected. Also, main itself is fine. When I call the function, that's when it starts acting up, which doesn't make sense to me since the values are received during main. Also, with respect to the function names, you make a good point, but I was just following the instructions from the assignment. –  nikifi Sep 19 '12 at 12:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

As it turns out the reason why it was doing this is because when comparing an array's neighbor to itself as in:

if (values[i + 1] > values [i])

The fact that I was just checking that it is greater than, without checking if it is '=' then it was causing it to behave undesirably. So if the array is for example [1, 1, 5, 2, 6, 8] then by 1 being next to a 1, my program did not account for this behavior and acted the way it did.

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