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Is it possible to prevent stack allocation of an object and only allow it to be instiated with 'new' on the heap?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 53 down vote accepted

One way you could do this would be to make the constructors private and only allow construction through a static method that returns a pointer. For example:

class Foo
{
public:
    ~Foo();
    static Foo* createFoo()
    {
        return new Foo();
    }
private:
    Foo();
    Foo(const Foo&);
    Foo& operator=(const Foo&);
};
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3  
+1 for remembering to make it uncopyable. –  Steve Jessop Sep 24 '08 at 1:34
4  
Or better still a static function that returns a std::unique_ptr<Foo>. –  Bleep Bloop Oct 2 '12 at 20:43
    

You could make the constructor private, then provide a public static factory method to create the objects.

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In the case of C++11

class Foo
{
  public:
    ~Foo();
    static Foo* createFoo()
    {
        return new Foo();
    }

    Foo(const Foo &) = delete; // if needed, put as private
    Foo & operator=(const Foo &) = delete; // if needed, put as private
    Foo(Foo &&) = delete; // if needed, put as private
    Foo & operator=(Foo &&) = delete; // if needed, put as private

  private:
    Foo();
};
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The following allows public constructors and will stop stack allocations by throwing at runtime. Note thread_local is a C++11 keyword.

class NoStackBase {
    const bool _stack;
    static thread_local bool _heap;
protected:
    NoStackBase(): _stack(!_heap) {
        _heap = false;
        if (_stack)
            throw std::logic_error("heap allocations only");
    }
public:
    virtual ~NoStackBase() {}
    void* operator new(size_t size) throw (std::bad_alloc) { 
        _heap = true;
        return ::operator new(size);
    }
    void* operator new(size_t size, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_value) throw () {
        _heap = true;
        return ::operator new(size, nothrow_value);
    }
    void* operator new(size_t size, void* ptr) throw () {
        _heap = true;
        return ::operator new(size, ptr);
    }
    void* operator new[](size_t size) throw (std::bad_alloc) {
        _heap = true;
        return ::operator new[](size);
    }
    void* operator new[](size_t size, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_value) throw () {
        _heap = true;
        return ::operator new[](size, nothrow_value);
    }
    void* operator new[](size_t size, void* ptr) throw () {
        _heap = true;
        return ::operator new[](size, ptr);
    }
};

bool thread_local NoStackBase::_heap = false;
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You could create a header file that provides an abstract interface for the object, and factory functions that return pointers to objects created on the heap.

// Header file

class IAbstract
{
	virtual void AbstractMethod() = 0;

public:
	virtual ~IAbstract();
};

IAbstract* CreateSubClassA();
IAbstract* CreateSubClassB();

// Source file

class SubClassA : public IAbstract
{
	void AbstractMethod() {}
};

class SubClassB : public IAbstract
{
	void AbstractMethod() {}
};

IAbstract* CreateSubClassA()
{
	return new SubClassA;
}

IAbstract* CreateSubClassB()
{
	return new SubClassB;
}
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