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I have a program which outputs the following in the compiler console after a failed build:

1>------ Build started: Project: BlackjackAttack, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
1>Build started 9/18/2012 10:59:28 PM.
1>InitializeBuildStatus:
1>  Touching "Debug\BlackjackAttack.unsuccessfulbuild".
1>ClCompile:
1>  main.cpp
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(5): error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(5): error C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'GAME_NAME'
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(5): error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int
1>  Display.cpp
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(5): error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(5): error C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'GAME_NAME'
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(5): error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int
1>  Config.cpp
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(5): error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(5): error C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'GAME_NAME'
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(5): error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int
1>c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.cpp(7): error C2039: 'GAME_NAME' : is not a member of 'Config'
1>          c:\bja\blackjackattack\config.h(1) : see declaration of 'Config'
1>  Generating Code...
1>
1>Build FAILED.
1>
1>Time Elapsed 00:00:01.32
========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

Config.h:

class Config {
public:
  static const int DEFAULT_CONSOLE_COLOR = 7;

  static const string GAME_NAME;
};

Config.cpp:

#include <string>

#include "Config.h"

using std::string;

const string Config::GAME_NAME = "Name";

main.cpp:

#include <iostream>

#include "Config.h"
#include "Display.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  return 0;
}

Could someone please explain why my program is outputting the above-mentioned errors?

Thank you for your time.

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closed as too localized by jogojapan, Clyde Lobo, Filburt, onof, eckes Sep 19 '12 at 19:51

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
You have included Config.h twice. Use guards. –  pickypg Sep 19 '12 at 3:07
2  
You also need to #include <string> and have some form of the std:: part. –  chris Sep 19 '12 at 3:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is caused by the way that you are including the Config.h file through out your project.

Since your Config class references std::string you must include std::string before you declare the class.

In your Config.cpp file you've resolved the conflict however you haven't done the same in your main.cpp file.

You have two options to fix your problem.

  1. Every time you include "Config.h" you include string.h and write the "using std::string" on the lines immediately above it.

  2. You include string.h at the top of your Config.h file along with the "using std::string;" directive.

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That's it. ;)... –  Oliver Spryn Sep 19 '12 at 3:19
1  
Als0o, I think that you'll need to use std::string in Config.h. –  Michael Burr Sep 19 '12 at 3:23

All of the above are incorrect, though the #include pattern seen here isn't "nice".

The problem is that is not included before using std::string. It is best to include in config.cpp, and then 'using namespace std'.

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The real problem is that you're using string instead of std::string in your config.h. Moving things around only masks the problem.

You could put the using std::string inside config.h but that's frowned upon - it introduces unnecessary symbols into any source that includes it.

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