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Is it possible to use jQuery to toggle the opacity of an element (so that you can fade it in/out by the means of -webkit-transition:opacity .5s linear;) and then change the display to display:block if the element is shown, or display:none if the element is hidden?

For example: You click on an <a> tag, which shows a div by means of setting it's opacity to 1 and setting display:block. Then you click the <a> tag again, and it sets the opacity to 0 and then sets the display to none.

My attempt at this is below:

.visible{
    opacity: 1;
    -webkit-transition:opacity .5s linear;
    display: block;
}

.close{
    display: none;
    opacity:0;
    width:20px;
    height:20px;
    background-color:red;   
    -webkit-transition:opacity .5s linear;
}

$(".toggle").click(function(){
if ($(".close").css("display") === "none") {
    $(".close").addClass("visible").delay(500).promise().done(function () {
        $(this).css("display", "block");
    });
};
if ($(".close").css("display") === "block") {
    $(".close").removeClass("visible").delay(500).promise().done(function () {
        $(this).css("display", "none");
    });
};
});

http://jsfiddle.net/charlescarver/zzP6g/

share|improve this question
    
Use $.is(':visible') or $.is(':hidden') in the if condition. – Jared Farrish Sep 19 '12 at 3:21
    
Maybe you can check this out fvsch.com/code/transition-fade/test5.html – theintersect Sep 19 '12 at 3:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This particular page of the documentation was helpful:

transition-property – What property should animate, e.g., opacity.

transition-duration – How long the transition should last.

transition-timing-function – The timing function for the transition (e.g., linear vs. ease-in vs. a custom cubic bezier function).

transition – A shorthand for all three properties.

So you can call a specific property, like opacity, or you can use all in a class name. I think the latter is possibly more useful, even if you have only one property to apply.

Basically, you can use a class with the all transition properties and toggle the class name. One of the things I found interesting was that you can actually do multiple versions on the class add (not quite the same effect occurs when removing the class, though). Also, couple opacity with width and height and it will work better than using display: none, as far as I could tell.

The below demonstrates how you could use the -webkit-transition property in layers. This is a simplified version, followed by a more sophisticated demonstration:

#block.transition let's me differentiate my transition properties:

<div id="block" class="transition"></div>

Basic properties, not animated:

#block {
    margin: 25px auto;
    background: red;
}

The initial "unseen" state:

#block.transition {
    opacity: 0;  
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    padding: 0;
    -webkit-transition: all 2s ease-in-out; 
}

And the animation steps:

#block.transition.show {
    opacity: .3;
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px;
    background: orange;
    -webkit-transition: all .5s ease-in-out; 
}
#block.transition.show {
    opacity: .4;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    background: black;
    -webkit-transition: all 1s ease-in-out; 
}
#block.transition.show {
    opacity: 1;  
    padding: 100px;
    background: blue;
    -webkit-transition: all 3s ease-in-out; 
}​

Note, all I'm doing here is toggling the .show class:

$(document).ready(function load(){
    var $block = $("#block");

    $('.toggle').click(function c(){
        $block.toggleClass('show');
    });
});​

Demo (Source)


Markup

<p><button class="toggle">Toggle Blocks</button></p>

<div id="block" class="transition">
    <div class="blocks transition"></div>
    <div class="blocks transition"></div>
    <div class="blocks transition"></div>
</div>

CSS

The containing #block:

#block {
    margin: 25px auto;
    background: #333;
    -webkit-transition: opacity, display, width 1.5s ease-in-out; 
}
#block.transition {
    opacity: 0;  
    width: 0;
    padding: 0;
    border: 1px solid yellow;
    -webkit-transition: all 1.9s ease-in-out; 
}
#block.transition.show {
    opacity: .3;  
    border-color: blue;
    -webkit-transition: all .5s ease-in-out; 
}
#block.transition.show {
    opacity: 1;  
    width: 550px;
    padding: 25px;
    border-width: 15px;
    -webkit-transition: all 3s ease-in-out; 
}

Group of three .blocks:

.blocks {
    display: inline-block;
    background-color: red;
}
.blocks.transition {
    opacity: .1; 
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    margin: 0; 
    -webkit-transition: all 1.7s ease-in-out; 
}
.blocks.transition.show {
    opacity: 1;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    margin: 10px;
    -webkit-transition: all 4.5s ease-in-out;
}​

jQuery

$(document).ready(function load(){
    var $block = $("#block"),
        $blocks = $block.find(".blocks.transition");

    $('.toggle').click(function c(){
        $block.toggleClass('show');

        $blocks.delay(1500).toggleClass('show');
    });
});​

Demo (Source)

share|improve this answer

This seems to be a duplicate: Transitions on the display: property
This question is very very similar, and should lead you to the same conclusion.

Best wishes,
Korvin

share|improve this answer
1  
Where's the CSS3 transition here? – elclanrs Sep 19 '12 at 3:26
    
It seemed as though he was asking for transitions because he wasn't aware of this option, if that isn't the case I will delete. – Korvin Szanto Sep 19 '12 at 3:29
    
This doesn't use CSS3 transitions, which I'm asking about. And if your wondering why, it's because on iOS, CSS3 transitions are hardware accelerated, jQ animations aren't. – Charlie Sep 19 '12 at 3:29
    
Let me amend, sorry about that. – Korvin Szanto Sep 19 '12 at 3:31
    
No problem at all :) – Charlie Sep 19 '12 at 3:32

Why don't you add an event listener to the CSS3 transition end events, when the event fires, you either hide or show the element.

$('.close').on('transitionend webkitAnimationEnd MozTransition OTransitionEnd MSTransitionEnd', function () {
    $(this).show();
});

With this solution, you can remove the setting the css property display to block or none in your click event, and handle it in the transitionend event handler.

If you need a more detailed example I would be happy to provide it. This is obviously just a starting point to get you in the right direction.

Full example:

$('.close').on('transitionend webkitAnimationEnd MozTransition OTransitionEnd MSTransitionEnd', function () {
    if (!$(this).hasClass('visible')) {
        $(this).css('display', 'none');
    } else {
        $(this).css('display', 'block');
    }
});

$(".toggle").click(function(){
    if ($(".close").is(':hidden')) {
        $(this).css('display', 'block');
        $(".close").addClass("visible");
    } else {           
        $(".close").removeClass("visible");
    }
});​
share|improve this answer
    
Could you post an example? It might be because I'm tired but I'm having a hard time visualizing this. – Charlie Sep 19 '12 at 3:34
    
Sure, give me a few minutes to put one together for you – Mark Sep 19 '12 at 3:35
    
Added a more detailed example. It may need some tweaking because I haven't fully tested it but the concept should work. – Mark Sep 19 '12 at 3:39

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