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I have a string like

01 01 01 02 01 01 20 00 40 0b 00 01 ef cc 45 4e 47 00 1a 02

How can I read this as input? I know declaring

String s = "01 01 01 02 01 01  20 00 40 0b 00 01 ef cc 45 4e  47 00 1a 02"

will obviously throw me error, so what are different possible ways I can read this input (passed as arguments) using Java?

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closed as not a real question by SuperMan, stealthyninja, martin clayton, Nikhil, evilone Oct 15 '12 at 7:42

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
"read this as input" What do you mean? How are you reading it? –  Vulcan Sep 19 '12 at 4:19
    
Var Args, Scanner or Reading from file –  gtgaxiola Sep 19 '12 at 4:19
    
updated my post! –  SuperMan Sep 19 '12 at 4:20
1  
Why do you say declaring the string will "obviously throw [you] error"? –  Ray Toal Sep 19 '12 at 4:21
1  
Your string declaration will not throw error. You have one string –  basiljames Sep 19 '12 at 4:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm assuming you want to read this in as hexadecimal data, not as a string.

Start by removing the whitespace in the string, so it should look like "0101010201012000400b0001efcc454e47001a02"

Then, create a BigInteger to hold it like so:

BigInteger hex = new BigInteger(s, 16);

Now you should have the hexadecimal value stored in the variable hex.

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3  
That particular string is too big for a long. Change your answer to use a BigInteger for an upvote. :) –  Ray Toal Sep 19 '12 at 4:26
    
This should be my answer! yes BigInteger would give u another vote ;) –  SuperMan Sep 19 '12 at 4:28
    
Oh, you're right, whoops! I'll change it over in a minute. –  J.Ashworth Sep 19 '12 at 4:35
    
+1 All good now. Yes the BigInteger constructor is preferred. –  Ray Toal Sep 19 '12 at 4:38
    
I never knew until I saw your answer and looked it up then that you could pass a radix value to BigInteger's constructor for easy conversion. You learn something new every day on this site :D –  J.Ashworth Sep 19 '12 at 4:39

Here is your mystery number

import java.math.BigInteger;
class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(new BigInteger("01 01 01 02 01 01 20 00 40 0b 00 01 ef cc 45 4e 47 00 1a 02".replaceAll("\\s+", ""), 16));
  }
}

It's

5731379310208105099069359549013101637718252034

See the live demo at http://ideone.com/uGh17

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If you passed them as variable arguments then you can get it like this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    if(args.length() > 0) {
        String myInput = args[0]; //Here is where you get them...
        //Process myInput
    }
}
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String s = "01 01 01 02 01 01 20 00 40 0b 00 01 ef cc 45 4e 47 00 1a 02";

should work...

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nope I am pretty sure it will throw Exception! –  SuperMan Sep 19 '12 at 4:21
5  
No, that line of code will compile and won't throw an exception. –  Pedantic Sep 19 '12 at 4:22
    
Try it out @SuperMan. Or tell us more about what you are doing. –  Wires77 Sep 19 '12 at 4:26

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