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I want to check whether the current time is between 10.30AM and 11.30AM with Jquery. How would I do this in correct manner?

I've tried the following way and its not working as I expected

function compareTime(){

  var d = new Date(), // current time
  hours = d.getHours(),// current hour
  mins = d.getMinutes(); // current minute

  var sTime = "10.30";
  var eTime = "11.30";
  var cTime = hours+'.'+mins;

  if(sTime < cTime < eTime){
     // here i want to do something if the current time is in between ...
  }else{

  }
}
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Why jQuery? This is something you'd normally do with "plain" JS. –  nnnnnn Sep 19 '12 at 7:01
    
@nnnnnn JQuery is cross browser compatible and lightweight that is the reason –  Swarnajith Sep 19 '12 at 7:49
    
I love jQuery, but what I'm saying is that it isn't intended to help you solve this type of problem. –  nnnnnn Sep 19 '12 at 8:08
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Nothing to do with jQuery:

function checkTime(d) {
  d = d || new Date();
  var minTime = new Date(d);
  var maxTime = new Date(d);

  minTime.setHours(10, 30, 0, 0);
  maxTime.setHours(11, 30, 0, 0);

  return d > minTime && d < maxTime;
}
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You don't even need to rewrite any of his function other than the conditional, why the setHours? –  Ohgodwhy Sep 19 '12 at 6:54
    
Ok I understood we have to compare it as dates not as strings. Thanks @RobG your method works correctly. –  Swarnajith Sep 19 '12 at 7:02
    
@Ohgodwhy—It's a demo to show a concept, the OP can use a function or just the logic, whatever. setHours is used to set the time of the Date objects used for comparison. You can just compare numbers, but this is simpler (to me). If you only compare hours and minutes then then 10:30:29 will be false (since 10:30 isn't after 10:30) but using the full time it will be true (since 10:30:29 is after 10:30). It's up to the OP to decide what they want. –  RobG Sep 19 '12 at 7:03
    
@RobG Thank you for the excellent breakdown. It's appreciated. +1. –  Ohgodwhy Sep 19 '12 at 7:05
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you can do like this,

var sTime = "10.30"
sTime = sTime.split("."); 
var eTime = "11.30";
eTime = eTime.split("."); 

so that eTime and sTime will become an array with sTime[0] = "10" and sTime[1] = "30", similarly eTime also. Now develop a loop to compare it with hours and mins.

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