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I want to remove foreign key from another table so i can insert values of my choice :)

I am new in databases so please tell me correct sql query to drop or remove foreign key value.

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12  
If you're new to databases, you first reaction when encountering a foreign key violation shouldn't be to think "I'll drop the foreign key". – Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 19 '12 at 6:55
    
possible duplicate of How do I drop a foreign key in SQL Server? – Liam Jan 23 '15 at 10:12
up vote 47 down vote accepted

Try following

ALTER TABLE <TABLE_NAME> DROP CONSTRAINT <FOREIGN_KEY_NAME>

Refer : http://www.w3schools.com/sql/sql_foreignkey.asp

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1  
I haven't added any constraint name. how do I delete that constraint? – Abhishek Goel Dec 1 '13 at 9:15
1  
Even if you don't specify the constrain name SQL Server will assign a unique constrain name. You can find the name with SQL Management Studio. – Edward Olamisan Aug 15 '14 at 15:58

Its wrong to do that in refer to referential integrity, because once its broken its not easy to turn it on again without having to go through the records and delete the ones which breaks the constraints.

Anyway the Syntax is as follows:

ALTER TABLE Tablename DROP CONSTRAINT ContName;

See MSDN:

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No, the syntax in SQL Server for dropping Foreign Key and Primary Key are the same: alter table <tablename> drop constraint <fk_or_pk_name> – demoncodemonkey Apr 16 '13 at 10:26
ALTER TABLE table
DROP FOREIGN KEY fk_key

EDIT: didn't notice you were using sql-server, my bad

ALTER TABLE table
DROP CONSTRAINT fk_key
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I am using SQL Server. – Ammar Asjad Sep 19 '12 at 7:14
    
so I noticed :) – mokuril Sep 19 '12 at 7:35
ALTER TABLE [TableName] DROP CONSTRAINT [CONSTRAINT_NAME]

But, be careful man, once you do that, you never get a chance back, and you should read some basic database book see why we need foreign key

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1  
He can just add the constraint again if he wants it back, as long as the referential integrity is still there. If it isn't, that has to be fixed anyway. – Tobberoth Dec 4 '14 at 10:08
    
@Tobberoth, yes, that what I meant, thanks for made it clear. In the real world most of the time some other developer will mess up the data in the table and you can't add the constraint back due to those data there. – Simon Wang Dec 4 '14 at 20:59

To remove all the constraints from the DB:

Select 'ALTER TABLE ' + Table_Name  +'  drop constraint ' + Constraint_Name
from Information_Schema.CONSTRAINT_TABLE_USAGE
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Use those queries to find all FKs:

Declare @SchemaName VarChar(200) = 'Schema Name'
Declare @TableName VarChar(200) = 'Table name'

-- Find FK in This table.
SELECT 
    'IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.foreign_keys WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N''' + 
      '[' + OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) + '].[' + FK.name + ']' 
      + ''') AND parent_object_id = OBJECT_ID(N''' + 
      '[' + OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) + '].[' 
      + OBJECT_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) + ']' + ''')) ' +

    'ALTER TABLE ' +  OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) +
    '.[' + OBJECT_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) + 
    '] DROP CONSTRAINT ' + FK.name
    , S.name , O.name, OBJECT_NAME(FK.parent_object_id)
FROM sys.foreign_keys AS FK
INNER JOIN Sys.objects As O 
  ON (O.object_id = FK.parent_object_id )
INNER JOIN SYS.schemas AS S 
  ON (O.schema_id = S.schema_id)  
WHERE 
      O.name = @TableName
      And S.name = @SchemaName


-- Find the FKs in the tables in which this table is used
  SELECT 
    ' IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.foreign_keys WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N''' + 
      '[' + OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) + '].[' + FK.name + ']' 
      + ''') AND parent_object_id = OBJECT_ID(N''' + 
      '[' + OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) + '].[' 
      + OBJECT_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) + ']' + ''')) ' +

    ' ALTER TABLE ' +  OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) +
    '.[' + OBJECT_NAME(FK.parent_object_id) + 
    '] DROP CONSTRAINT ' + FK.name
    , S.name , O.name, OBJECT_NAME(FK.parent_object_id)
FROM sys.foreign_keys AS FK
INNER JOIN Sys.objects As O 
  ON (O.object_id = FK.referenced_object_id )
INNER JOIN SYS.schemas AS S 
  ON (O.schema_id = S.schema_id)  
WHERE 
      O.name = @TableName
      And S.name = @SchemaName 
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You should consider (temporarily) disabling the constraint before you completely delete it.

If you look at the table creation TSQL you will see something like:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[dbAccounting] CHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_some_FK_constraint]

You can run

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[dbAccounting] NOCHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_some_FK_constraint]

... then insert/update a bunch of values that violate the constraint, and then turn it back on by running the original CHECK statement.

(I have had to do this to cleanup poorly designed systems I've inherited in the past.)

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