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I have a function as below

int* readFile(string InputPath)
{
    int *myvar = new int[10]; //The file has 10 lines (Using heap)

    ifstream inFile;

    inFile.open(InputPath.c_str(), ios::in);

    if (inFile.fail())
    {
        cout << "Error reading the input file ";
        cout << InputPath << ".";
        exit(0);
    }
    string fileLine;

    while (getline(inFile, fileLine))
    {
       myvar[i]=toint(fileLine); //will be converted to int!
    }
    ;
    inFile.close();



    return myvar;
}:

How can I free the heap (myvar)? In general, what is the best method to return such array?

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9  
Best method - use std::vector<int>. –  ForEveR Sep 19 '12 at 7:31
1  
You are passing the responisibilty on to the caller of the function. It's better to return a smart pointer (that manages the ownership), or use a container. –  Bo Persson Sep 19 '12 at 7:33
    
@BoPersson: I concur, but I think that's the least of his concerns given that he does an exit(0) if the given file can't be opened. :-] –  Frerich Raabe Sep 19 '12 at 7:35
    
std::unique_ptr might be what you're looking for here. –  marko Sep 25 '12 at 21:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It clearly becomes the responsibility of the caller, to call delete[] on it. Note that this means the caller has to know that the returned pointer is allocated with new[], which isn't exactly optimal.

You should return a std::vector<int> instead, which makes it all so much simpler.

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How can I free the heap (myvar)?

The int* you return; don't change it, don't lose it, and when you're done with the memory,

delete [] theReturnedPointer;

Unless you've got a really good reason for making it an array, you could save yourself the bother of memory management and just use a vector.

best method

The best method is to return a vector:

vector<int> readFile(const string& InputPath)
{
    ifstream inFile(InputPath); // or inputPath.c_str() for old compilers
    if (!inFile)
    {
        cout << "Error reading the input file " << InputPath << ".";
        exit(0); // thow would be better! Or at least return an empty vector.
    }

    vector<int> myvar;
    for(int n; inFile >> n && myvar.size() < 10; )
    {
       myvar.push_back(n);
    }
    return myvar;
}

But if you really really want to use new[], then at least return the self-managing pointer, std::unique_ptr<int[]>. Never let a raw pointer escape a function, not in C++.

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1  
I think your for loop is quite creative, I had to read that twice to understand what's going on. –  Frerich Raabe Sep 19 '12 at 7:37
1  
+ 1 for std::unique_ptr<int []> –  Ram Sep 19 '12 at 8:04

The caller must delete[] the value returned from the function. The code as it stands provides no protection for writing beyond the end of the array:

while (getline(inFile, fileLine))
{
    myvar[i]=toint(fileLine); //will be converted to int!
}

However, as this is C++ use a std::vector<int> instead and read ints directly from the input stream instead of reading them as strings and performing the conversion. The std::vector<int> will handle memory management for you:

std::vector<int> myvar;

int i;
while (inFile >> i) myvar.push_back(i);

Return the std::vector<int> from the function. The caller can know exactly how many ints are in the return value (which it cannot if you return an array unless you include a sentinel value to indicate the end) and does not need to explicitly delete it.

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There must be some code which will call delete on this pointer.

I think, better way to do this is to get a pointer as argument. Doing it that way would force someone using this function to initialize array, so he would know, he has to delete it in the future.

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The convention in C++ is to not return allocated memory. Instead, the function prototype should look like

size_t readFile(string InputPath,int* array,size_t n_elements);

The function returns the number of elements it actually placed in array. The caller will allocate and free memory using appropriate method, not nessecary new/delete[] but also malloc/free or lower level system functions such as VirtualAlloc.

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