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Let's say you have an array of strings such as:

var fruit = ["apple","peach","pear","plum"];

and an empty array that is to be filled with objects, each of which will have a text property bound to a specific index of the fruit array:

var objlist = [];

for (var i=0;i<fruit.length;i++) {
    objlist.push({text: fruit[i]});
}

//objlist[0].text = "apple", objlist[1].text = "peach", etc.

Is there a way to "bind" the elements of the first array so the following statement:

fruit.shift()

will cause the text properties of the objects in objlist to update to their corresponding index in the fruit array?

//objlist[0].text = "peach", objlist[1].text = "pear", etc.

I've come to terms with the fact that .text will probably have to be a function .text() but that's okay for my purposes.

The following doesn't work for obvious reasons:

for (var i=0;i<fruit.length;i++) {
    objlist.push({text: function() { return fruit[i]; }});  //i is not bound
}

However, this works perfectly:

[0,1,2,3].forEach(function(i) {
    objlist.push({text: function() { return fruit[i]; }});  //i is bound
});

With the second method I can modify fruit[] and objlist will update accordingly, but it's not elegant.

My question: is there a better method to do this? Maybe something akin to using pointers?

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I don't think there's a way to automatically link the two arrays. Couldn't you write a function that removes the element from both fruit and objlist? –  Barmar Sep 19 '12 at 8:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is not necessary to create additional array because you can make binding by for-in construction. Like this

for (var k in fruit) {
    objlist.push({text: function() { return fruit[k]; }});
}

So, with your test cases

var fruit = ["apple","peach","pear","plum"];
var objlist = [];

for (var k in fruit) {
    objlist.push({text: function() { return fruit[k]; }});
}

console.log('---- init state -----')
for(k in objlist) {
    console.log(objlist[k].text());
}

fruit.shift();
console.log('---- shifted state -----')
for(k in objlist) {
    console.log(objlist[k].text());
}

The code gets

---- init state -----
apple
peach
pear
plum
---- shifted state -----
peach
pear
plum
undefined
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, I never thought to use for-in. It seems to be doing the closure thing automatically. I figured out another method using text:(function(n) { return function() { return fruit[n]; }}(i) but I like your method better. –  Jeremy Robson Oct 19 '12 at 5:19

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