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I have a question about TSQL function Update. For example, I have a table with a field Name. If I check if the field Name is changed or not in a After Update trigger likes this:

  if Update(Name)
  Begin
    -- process
  End

Will the Update still return TRUE even if Name is not changed? The following update statement will update it with the same value:

  SELECT @v_Name = Name From MyTable Where Id = 1;
  Update MyTable Set Name = @v_Name where Id = 1;

If the Update() returns TRUE even the value of Name is not changed, do I have to compare the value in the inserted and deleted virtual tables to find out if the value is really changed?

By the way, the inserted and deleted are virtual tables and they may contain more than one rows of data if more than one rows of data are changed by one TSQL INSERT or UPDATE statement. In case of more than one records, are the count numbers of rows in inserted and deleted virtual tables the same and what is the real meaning of Update(Name) as TRUE? Does it mean that at least one is changed? Or does Update(Name) mean that the field of Name has been set by Update statement regardless if the value is changed?

The SQL server I use is Microsoft SQL 2005.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

UPDATE() can be true, even if it's the same value. I would not rely on it personally and would compare values.

Second, DELETED and INSERTED have the same number of rows.

The Update() function is not per row, but across all rows. Another reason not to use it.

More here in MSDN, however it's a bit sparse, really.

After comment:

IF EXISTS (
    SELECT
        *
    FROM
        INSERTED I
        JOIN
        DELETED D ON I.key = D.key
    WHERE
        D.valuecol <> I.valuecol --watch for NULLs!
    )
   blah
share|improve this answer
    
thank you. Any other options available from SQL server to find out the change? Or I have to loop through each row to find out changes? –  David.Chu.ca Aug 8 '09 at 14:49
1  
Just join the 2 tables on the key, no loosp needed –  gbn Aug 8 '09 at 14:50
1  
That would have to be the deleted and **inserted** virtual tables, right? I've never heard of an "updated" virtual table –  marc_s Aug 8 '09 at 14:51
    
@marc_s: doh! corrected... –  gbn Aug 8 '09 at 14:53
2  
Just to be pedantic, the deleted and inserted tables only have the same number of rows when an update has been performed, or when no rows are affected (in a delete or an insert). –  ErikE Feb 5 '12 at 9:07

Triggers are tricky and you need to think in bulk when you're creating one. A trigger fires once for each UPDATE statement. If that UPDATE statement updates multiple rows, the trigger will still only fire once. The UPDATE() function returns true for a column when that column is included in the UPDATE statement. That function helps to improve the efficiency of triggers by allowing you to sidestep SQL logic when that column isn't even included in the update statement. It doesn't tell you if the value changed for a column in a given row.

Here's a sample table...

CREATE TABLE tblSample
(
    SampleID INT PRIMARY KEY,
    SampleName VARCHAR(10),
    SampleNameLastChangedDateTime DATETIME,
    Parent_SampleID INT
)

If the following SQL was used against this table:

UPDATE tblSample SET SampleName = 'hello'

..and an AFTER INSERT, UPDATE trigger was in effect, this particular SQL statement would always evaluate the UPDATE function as follows...

IF UPDATE(SampleName) --aways evaluates to TRUE
IF UPDATE(SampleID)  --aways evaluates to FALSE
IF UPDATE(Parent_SampleID) --aways evaluates to FALSE

Note that UPDATE(SampleName) would always be true for this SQL statement, regardless of what the SampleName values were before. It returns true because the UPDATE statement includes the column SampleName in the SET section of that clause and not based on what the values were before or afterward. The UPDATE() function will not determine if the values changed. If you want to do actions based on whether the values are changed you're going to need to use SQL and compare the inserted and deleted rows.

Here's an approach to keeping a last updated column in sync:

--/*
IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.tgr_tblSample_InsertUpdate', 'TR') IS NOT NULL 
  DROP TRIGGER dbo.tgr_tblSample_InsertUpdate
GO
--*/

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.tgr_tblSample_InsertUpdate ON dbo.tblSample
  AFTER INSERT, UPDATE 
AS
BEGIN --Trigger

  IF UPDATE(SampleName)  
    BEGIN
      UPDATE tblSample SET
      SampleNameLastChangedDateTime = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
      WHERE
        SampleID IN (SELECT Inserted.SampleID 
               FROM Inserted LEFT JOIN Deleted ON Inserted.SampleID = Deleted.SampleID
               WHERE COALESCE(Inserted.SampleName, '') <> COALESCE(Deleted.SampleName, ''))
    END

END --Trigger

The logic to determine if the row was updated is in the WHERE clause above. That's the real check you need to do. My logic is using COALESCE to handle NULL values and INSERTS.

...
WHERE
  SampleID IN (SELECT Inserted.SampleID 
               FROM Inserted LEFT JOIN Deleted ON Inserted.SampleID = Deleted.SampleID
               WHERE COALESCE(Inserted.SampleName, '') <> COALESCE(Deleted.SampleName, ''))

Note that the IF UPDATE() check is used to help improve the efficiency of the trigger for when the SampleName column is NOT being updated. If a SQL statement updated the Parent_SampleID column for instance then that IF UPDATE(SampleName) check would help sidestep around the more complex logic in that IF statement when it doesn't need to run. Consider using UPDATE() when it's appropriate but not for the wrong reason.

Also realize that depending on your architecture, the UPDATE function may have no use to you. If your code architecture uses a middle-tier that always updates all columns in a row of a table with the values in the business object when the object is saved, the UPDATE() function in a trigger becomes useless. In that case, your code is likely always updating all the columns with every UPDATE statement issued from the middle-tier. That being the case, the UPDATE(columnname) function would always evaluate to true when your business objects are saved because all the column names are always included in the update statements. In that case, it would not be helpful to use UPDATE() in the trigger and would just be extra overhead in that trigger for a majority of the time.

Here's some SQL to play with the trigger above:

INSERT INTO tblSample
(
  SampleID,
  SampleName
)
SELECT 1, 'One'
UNION SELECT 2, 'Two'
UNION SELECT 3, 'Three'

GO
SELECT SampleID, SampleName, SampleNameLastChangedDateTime FROM tblSample

/*
SampleID  SampleName SampleNameLastChangedDateTime
----------- ---------- -----------------------------
1       One    2010-10-27 14:52:42.567
2       Two    2010-10-27 14:52:42.567
3       Three  2010-10-27 14:52:42.567
*/

GO

INSERT INTO tblSample
(
  SampleID,
  SampleName
)
SELECT 4, 'Foo'
UNION SELECT 5, 'Five'

GO
SELECT SampleID, SampleName, SampleNameLastChangedDateTime FROM tblSample
/*
SampleID  SampleName SampleNameLastChangedDateTime
----------- ---------- -----------------------------
1       One    2010-10-27 14:52:42.567
2       Two    2010-10-27 14:52:42.567
3       Three  2010-10-27 14:52:42.567
4       Foo    2010-10-27 14:52:42.587
5       Five   2010-10-27 14:52:42.587
*/

GO

UPDATE tblSample SET SampleName = 'Foo' 

SELECT SampleID, SampleName, SampleNameLastChangedDateTime FROM tblSample 
/*
SampleID  SampleName SampleNameLastChangedDateTime
----------- ---------- -----------------------------
1       Foo    2010-10-27 14:52:42.657
2       Foo    2010-10-27 14:52:42.657
3       Foo    2010-10-27 14:52:42.657
4       Foo    2010-10-27 14:52:42.587
5       Foo    2010-10-27 14:52:42.657
*/
GO

UPDATE tblSample SET SampleName = 'Not Prime' WHERE SampleID IN (1,4)

SELECT SampleID, SampleName, SampleNameLastChangedDateTime FROM tblSample
/*
SampleID  SampleName SampleNameLastChangedDateTime
----------- ---------- -----------------------------
1       Not Prime  2010-10-27 14:52:42.680
2       Foo        2010-10-27 14:52:42.657
3       Foo        2010-10-27 14:52:42.657
4       Not Prime  2010-10-27 14:52:42.680
5       Foo        2010-10-27 14:52:42.657
*/

--Clean up...
DROP TRIGGER dbo.tgr_tblSample_InsertUpdate
DROP TABLE tblSample

User GBN had suggested the following:

IF EXISTS (
    SELECT
        *
    FROM
        INSERTED I
        JOIN
        DELETED D ON I.key = D.key
    WHERE
        D.valuecol <> I.valuecol --watch for NULLs!
    )
   blah

GBN's suggestion of using an IF (EXISTS( ...clause and putting the logic in that IF statement if rows exist that were changed could work. That approach will fire for ALL rows included in the trigger even if only some of the rows were actually changed (which may be appropriate for your solution, but also may not be appropriate if you only want to do something to rows where the values changed.) If you need to do something to rows where an actual change has occurred, you need different logic in your SQL that he provided.

In my examples above, when the UPDATE tblSample SET SampleName = 'Foo' statement is issued and the fourth row is already 'foo', using GBN's approach to update a "last changed datetime" column would also update the fourth row, which would not be appropriate in this case.

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I agree the best way to determine if a column value has actually changed (as opposed to being updated with the same value) is to do a comparison of the column values in the deleted and inserted pseudo tables. However, this can be a real pain if you want to check more than a few columns.

Here's a trick I came across in some code I was maintaining (don't know the original author): Use a UNION and a GROUP BY with a HAVING clause to determine which columns have changed.

eg, in the trigger, to get the ID's of the rows that have changed:

SELECT SampleID
FROM 
    (
        SELECT SampleID, SampleName
        FROM deleted

        -- NOTE: UNION, not UNION ALL.  UNION by itself removes duplicate 
        --  rows.  UNION ALL includes duplicate rows.
        UNION 

        SELECT SampleID, SampleName
        FROM inserted
    ) x
GROUP BY SampleID
HAVING COUNT(*) > 1

This is too much work when you're only checking if a single column has changed. But if you're checking 10 or 20 columns the UNION method is a lot less work than

WHERE COALESCE(Inserted.Column1, '') <> COALESCE(Deleted.Column1, '')
    OR COALESCE(Inserted.Column2, '') <> COALESCE(Deleted.Column2, '')
    OR COALESCE(Inserted.Column3, '') <> COALESCE(Deleted.Column3, '')
    OR ...
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I think that the following code is better than the examples above to determine if a value has changed in particular columns. I have not investigated its performance compared with the other solutions but it is working well in my database.

It uses the EXCEPT set operator to return any distinct values from the left query that are not also found on the right query. This will detect changes in INSERT and UPDATE triggers. The "SampleID" column is required to enable matching between the two sets.

-- Only do trigger logic if specific field values change.
IF EXISTS(SELECT  SampleID
                ,Column1
                ,Column7
                ,Column10
          FROM inserted
          EXCEPT
          SELECT SampleID
                ,Column1
                ,Column7
                ,Column10
          FROM deleted )    -- Tests for modifications to fields that we are interested in
BEGIN
          -- Put code here that does the work in the trigger

END

I hope this is of interest :-)

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The update trigger will fire on all update statements. the impacted rows are available within the trigger in the "inserted" and "deleted" tables. You can compare the old and new values by comparing the PK columns in the two tables (if you have a PK). The actual table remains unchanged till the trigger finishes execution.

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