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I'm passing the function:

fillArrays(arrays);

Now, arrays is a 2 dimensional array. I declared the arrays like so:

int **arrays = new int*[NUM_OF_ARRAYS];
    arrays[0] = new int[128];
    arrays[1] = new int[512];
    arrays[2] = new int[2048];
    arrays[3] = new int[8192];
    arrays[4] = new int[32768];
    arrays[5] = new int[131072];
    arrays[6] = new int[524288];
    arrays[7] = new int[2097152];

Am I passing arrays into the following function correctly?

void fillArrays(int **arrays) {
    const int NUM_OF_ARRAYS = 8;
    for(int i = 0;i < NUM_OF_ARRAYS;i++) {
        switch(i) {
        case 0:
            for(int j = 0;j < 128;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 2000;
            break;
        case 1:
            for(int j = 0;j < 512;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 5000;
            break;
        case 2:
            for(int j = 0;j < 2048;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 10000;
            break;
        case 3:
            for(int j = 0;j< 8192;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 30000;
            break;
        case 4:
            for(int j = 0;j < 32768;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 100000;
            break;
        case 5:
            for(int j = 0;j < 131072;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 200000;
            break;
        case 6:
            for(int j = 0;j < 524288;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 1000000;
            break;
        case 7:
            for(int j = 0;j < 2097152;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 30000000;
            break;
        }
    }
}

Please let me know if you need any further information, thanks!

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closed as too localized by tereško, Lusitanian, sylvanaar, joran, Graviton Sep 20 '12 at 3:51

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1  
How exacly did you declare arrays? –  LeeNeverGup Sep 19 '12 at 9:22
2  
Very tempted to give "Yes, you do pass arrays correctly" as an answer :P –  TravisG Sep 19 '12 at 9:22
    
@LeeNeverGup I added my declarations to the question. –  user173424 Sep 19 '12 at 9:25
3  
OT: Get rid of the outer loop - you loop over code that immediately disambiguates every iteration into separate code branch. This is pointless. –  Fiktik Sep 19 '12 at 9:27
    
I'm sorry, but are you faced with some sort of problem that you think resulted from passing the array? Is there another point to this question? –  StoryTeller Sep 19 '12 at 9:29

4 Answers 4

I'll try to take a different approach and give a comprehensive answer, perhaps it will be more clarifying. The function will take any variable that fits the exact type of the parameter it was declared with. A basic array in C++ is simply a constant pointer (Points to the beginning, holds the space size for the rest). Storing an array of arrays by memory allocation using pointers is not exactly the same as a 2D array generated by C++ (The assembly code generated for datatype arrays[const][const] and for **arrays = new datatype[const]is different). This is important to know because your can draw the distinction between a pointer to a pointer and a 2D C++ generated array.

To keep things simple, treat your parameter exactly as it is: a pointer to a pointer. If that is what you are passing to the function, which is your case, then you are passing the right variable to the right parameter. The way you handle that parameter within the function will be what determines if you are treating it as a 2D array or not.

I'm answering this way because there seems to be some doubt on why a pointer to a pointer is treated as a 2D array. If that is the case, you are right to doubt. The 2D array is just an interpretation of what the variable is holding, but the variable is still a pointer to a pointer and you give it the same treatment as with other pointer variables (Memory allocation and deallocation, passing as parameter, handling, etc...).

As for replacing it with structs (classes) and whatnot: I believe you are doing things that way in order to better comprehend memory allocation and pointing by creating dynamic multidimensional arrays, using C++ simply as the mean. If that is the case, then I believe my answer will fit your needs well. Otherwise, there are alternatives which are better abstracted and that will automatically handle memory allocation (For C++, search for STL containers). By doing it your way, you increase your understanding of what goes on "behind the scenes", if you will. It is knowledge of greater importance in computational science than in modern or future programmatic usage.

Hopefully the answer was such that you will be able to handle similar situations by understanding what is happening, which is generally the true cause for incorrect syntax in these cases. English is not my native language; I apologize in advance for possible semantic misuses.

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I dont think there is any issue with passing of arrays. But what i will be more concerned about is the scope and lifetime of the variables. The array elements should be accessible inside your function.

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they are accessible inside his function –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 19 '12 at 9:30
    
@SingerOfTheFall, I believe that is what he said. –  Artie Sep 19 '12 at 12:05

Here's what will work and what won't.

  1. The passing of arrays will work fine .

  2. You will also need to enclose the for loop in the switch block with curly brackets {..}.

Full code listing:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std ;

const int NUM_OF_ARRAYS = 8;
int **arrays = new int*[NUM_OF_ARRAYS];
void fillArrays(int **arrays);


int main(void)
{

   arrays[0] = new int[128];
    arrays[1] = new int[512];
    arrays[2] = new int[2048];
    arrays[3] = new int[8192];
    arrays[4] = new int[32768];
    arrays[5] = new int[131072];
    arrays[6] = new int[524288];
    arrays[7] = new int[2097152];


   fillArrays(arrays);


  cout<<" \nPress any key to continue\n";
  cin.ignore();
  cin.get();

   return 0;
}


void fillArrays(int **arrays) 
{
    const int NUM_OF_ARRAYS = 8;
    for(int i = 0;i < NUM_OF_ARRAYS;i++) 
    {
        switch(i) 
        {
        case 0:
            {
            for(int j = 0;j < 128;j++)
            {
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 2000;
                cout<<arrays[i][j]<<"\n";}
            }
            break;

        case 1:
            {
            for(int j = 0;j < 512;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 5000;
            }
            break;

        case 2:
            {
            for(int j = 0;j < 2048;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 10000;
            }
            break;

        case 3:
            {
            for(int j = 0;j< 8192;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 30000;
            }
            break;

        case 4:
            {
            for(int j = 0;j < 32768;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 100000;
            }
            break;

        case 5:
            {
            for(int j = 0;j < 131072;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 200000;
            }
            break;

        case 6:
            {
            for(int j = 0;j < 524288;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 1000000;
            }
            break;

        case 7:
            {
            for(int j = 0;j < 2097152;j++)
                arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % 30000000;
            }
            break;

        }
    }
}
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The way you are passing arrays is fine, however you can shorten your function greatly. If you are going to need only these values, you can simply do:

void fillArrays(int **arrays) {

    int divisors[8] = {2000,5000,10000,30000,100000,200000,1000000,30000000};
    int bounds[8] = {128,512,2048,8192,32768,131072,524288,2097152};

    for( int i = 1; i < 7; i++ )
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < bounds[i]; j++ )
            arrays[i][j] = 1 + rand() % divisors[i];
    }
}
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