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Assume I have the following class:

class Foo
{
    static function bar($inputs)
    {
         return $something;
    }
}

Now, in a test class I have the following structure:

class FooTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    function testBar()
    {
         $result = Foo::bar($sample_data_1);
         $this->assertSomething($result);

         $result = Foo::bar($sample_data_2);
         $this->assertSomething($result);

         $result = Foo::bar($sample_data_3);
         $this->assertSomething($result);
    }
}

Is this a good structure? Should I divide testBar() into 3 separate functions? Why? Why not?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you are using the same code with different data set and you are expecting similar output you can use the dataProvider() feature

Example adapted from the PHPUnit docs:

<?php
class DataTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    /**
     * @dataProvider provider
     */
    public function testAdd($sample, $data, $result)
    {
        $this->assertEquals($result, Foo::bar($sample, $data);
    }

    public function provider()
    {
        return array(
          array(0, 0, 0),
          array(0, 1, 1),
          array(1, 0, 1),
          array(1, 1, 3)
        );
    }
}

if you have completely different return values/structures, for example it returns XML and JSON depending on the input, then having multiple tests is preferable as you can use the proper assert[Xml/Json]StringMatches() functions and you get better error output.

For additional error checks I'd recommend adding more test methods:

/**
 * @expectedException InvalidArgumentException
 */
public function testError() {
    Foo::bar("invalidArgument");
}
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