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I am having trouble getting always() to fire on my Deferred in jQuery. done() and fail() work fine, but somehow I must be doing something wrong, because always() never fires.

With $.when it works...

var Validator = {
    validate_something: function(value) {
        var deferred = new $.Deferred();

        deferred.resolve();

        return deferred.promise();
    },

    validate_date: function(value) {
        var deferred = new $.Deferred();

        deferred.resolve();

        return deferred.promise();
    }
};


function doneCallback() {
    console.log("$.then.done() executed");
}

function failCallback() {
    console.log("$.then.fail() executed");
}

function alwaysCallback() {
    console.log("$.then.always() executed");
}

var validationPromise = $.when(
    Validator.validate_date(6).then(doneCallback, failCallback, alwaysCallback),
    Validator.validate_something(1).then(doneCallback, failCallback, alwaysCallback)
);

validationPromise.done(function() {
    console.log("$.when.done() executed");
});
validationPromise.fail(function() {
    console.log("$.when.fail() executed");
});
validationPromise.always(function() {
    console.log("$.when.always() executed");
});
​

See http://jsfiddle.net/6j6K2/

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Answering my own question: the constructor takes three arguments, but the last one is for progressCallbacks. You need to call always() separately.

var validate_date = Validator.validate_date(6).then(doneCallback, failCallback);
validate_date.always(alwaysCallback);

var validate_something = Validator.validate_something(1).then(doneCallback, failCallback);
validate_something.always(alwaysCallback);

var validationPromise = $.when(
    validate_date,
    validate_something
);
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1  
You'd better use done, fail and progress all the time. then is an alias to pipe as of 1.8.0 which means it's much much slower since it has to account for potentially convoluted scenarios. –  Julian Aubourg Sep 19 '12 at 13:01
1  
Thanks for the tip. I have actually started doing that anyhow, because it results in much more readable code. –  Joseph Tura Sep 19 '12 at 13:14
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