Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is it possible to change the "this" scope of an object, from the outside, very much like in javascript?

I see an interesting application, where one could create a container object, having multiple components, where every time a component modifies a property on its own, it actually implicitly modifies a property on the container.

Do not get me wrong. I know that the same effect can be achieved with events, bindings, observers, and what not. Possibilities are indeed endless. I am just curious about this funky way of delegation.

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can achieve that using Reflect.callMethod, but you must know that it won't be type-safe at compile-time. Here is a little example :

class Test
{
    public var a:Int;

    public function new()
    {
        this.a = 0;
    }
}

class Test2
{
    public var a:Int;

    public function new()
    {
        this.a = 0;
    }

    public function increment()
    {
        this.a++;
    }

    static public function main()
    {
        var t = new Test2();
        var t2 = new Test();
        Reflect.callMethod(t2, Reflect.field(t, "increment"), []);

        trace(t2.a); //Traces 1
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I had no idea that was possible... took me a while to wrap my head around it, cool hack – Jason O'Neil Sep 20 '12 at 2:00

Another possible way would be to use macros to rebuild your code for using some another object instead of this. However, it would be relatively hard and IMO pointless. I don't really understand your idea, but basing what I understood from your description, I'd recommend you to look into inline getters and setters on components which would also modify container.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.