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Simple question: what happens if I do this:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [self performSelectorInBackground:@selector(myBGMethod) withObject:nil];
}

-(void)myBGMethod
{
    [self myOtherMethod];
}

-(void)myOtherMethod
{
    NSLog(@"This is not Inception");
    //some more code here
}

Will the NSLog() and other code in myOtherMethod be run on the main thread or in the background?

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1  
The Xcode debugger answers all. You can put a breakpoint on NSLog() and you can see what thread it's running on. –  NSBum Sep 19 '12 at 11:38
    
Think about it -- if a call switched you back to the main thread then you would be running every iOS function you called in the main thread, kinda eliminating the point of switching to background. –  Hot Licks Sep 19 '12 at 11:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It'll be run in the background thread.

You can confirm this by calling NSLog inside all your methods. By default, NSLog prints the thread number along the process ID (pid).

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It'll be run in the background. Once you make the call to myBGMethod in another thread, whatever it calls is made on that same thread unless it specifically requests another thread.

As a side note, depending on which version of iOS you want to support, you might want to learn more about Grand Central Dispatch. It makes multithreading a lot simpler.

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OK, thanks: I'll have a read of the documentation... –  Jugale Sep 19 '12 at 11:51

If you are ever curious about what thread a particular line of code is executing on, you can put a breakpoint on that line and check the Debug Navigator pane in Xcode:

enter image description here

In this case, I put a breakpoint on NSLog(...)

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
    NSLog(@"HI!");
});

and you can see that we're in Thread 2 com.apple.root.default-priority

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OK, great! Thanks for the tip! –  Jugale Sep 19 '12 at 11:51

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