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I am writing simple drop formula for player A vs. B fights - level difference determinates drop rate. My issue here is that instead of 0: > 10 ||| 1 vs. 1 = 10% it gives 0: > 10 ||| 1 vs. 1 = 0% - why?

PhpFiddle: http://www.phpfiddle.org/main/code/n1q-dw7

<?php

# lets simulate high level player A attacks low level player B
for ($A = 1; $A <= 100; $A++) {
    $B = 1;
    calculateMoneyDrop($A,$B);
}

# lets simulate low level player A attacks high level player B
for ($B = 1; $B <= 100; $B++) {
    $A = 1;
    calculateMoneyDrop($A,$B);
}

function calculateMoneyDrop($A,$B) {
    $X = $A - $B;
    echo '<strong>', $X, '</strong>: ';

    switch ($X) {
        case $X > 10:
            echo "> 10 ||| ";
            $X = 10;
            break;
        case $X < -90:
            echo "< -90 ||| ";
            $X = -90;
            break;
    }

    $dropRate = 10 - $X;
    echo $A, ' vs. ', $B, ' = ', $dropRate, '%<br>';

}
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2  
Why using switch instead of if ? –  Dev Sep 19 '12 at 11:51
1  
Your expected result should be 0 1 vs. 1 = 10%, it shouldn't execute either of your case statements, but as you only have two conditions and no default, why not use an if and see if that returns the expected result? –  FJT Sep 19 '12 at 11:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, in your $X > 10 case you set $X = 10 and later calculate $dropRate as 10 - $X, which is 10 - 10, which is 0.

Either the $dropRate should be $X if the desired outcome is 10. It also strikes me funny that the output says $X == 0 first, but then enters the switch case $X > 10... Are you sure that you're showing us all the code?

Also I don't think it's good practice to use the switch case like that. This is a typical candidate for an if block.

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Go and test it in fiddle if you dont belive –  Ultra Sep 19 '12 at 12:19
    
The reason for entering the switch case for $X > 10 is explained by Karoly Horvath in his answer. $X is 0 and 0 equals false in PHP and $X > 10 (which is 0 > 10) also equals false, so the case matches (the condition $X > 10 is false and $X is also "false"), so this case is entered. Long story short: Use if clauses and you're fine. –  Thorsten Dittmar Sep 19 '12 at 12:44
    
Just seen this explanation. switch (true) also resolves the problem –  FJT Sep 19 '12 at 12:52
    
That would be about the worst thing to do, don't you think? The switch statement has its purpose in PHP, but this situation just isn't the situation to use it. –  Thorsten Dittmar Sep 19 '12 at 13:39

It's simply how switch-case works. It checks whether $X equals to the value you list in case. Since that value is a boolean (result of a comparison is a boolean!), and PHP has a crazy way to compare different types (in this case int and bool), that block of case will actually be executed.

Use if statements, or use min and max.

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That is a really great explanation I didn't even consider! That explains at least why it enters the $X > 10 case... –  Thorsten Dittmar Sep 19 '12 at 12:05

If you change your switch to

 switch (true) {

the original code runs correctly.

Perhaps someone with better php than me can explain why!

http://www.phpfiddle.org/main/code/6pg-nwc

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Just seen Thorsten's explanation. Great, thanks! –  FJT Sep 19 '12 at 12:51

Your switch block does the same as:

if(($X > 10)==$X){
        echo "> 10 ||| ";
        $X = 10;
}
else if(($X < -90)==$X){
        echo "< -90 ||| ";
        $X = -90;
}

It compares whatever you have at "case" to whatever you have in the switches parentheses. Switch is used only for "equals" comparisons. so, to make it work, use:

if($X > 10){
        echo "> 10 ||| ";
        $X = 10;
}
else if($X < -90){
        echo "< -90 ||| ";
        $X = -90;
}
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