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I have two numbers (binary or not, does not play any role) which differ in just one bit, e.g. (pseudocode)

a = 11111111
b = 11011111

I want a simple python function that returns the bit position that differs ('5' in the given example, when seen from right to left). My solution would be (python)

math.log(abs(a-b))/math.log(2)

but I wonder if there is a more elegant way to do this (without using floats etc.).

Thanks Alex

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1  
Try with bitwise XOR instead of abs(a-b) –  LeeNeverGup Sep 19 '12 at 12:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use the binary exclusive:

a = 0b11111111
b = 0b11011111

diff = a^b  # 0b100000
diff.bit_length()-1 # 5 (the first position (backwards) which differs, 0 if a==b )
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Use (a^b).bit_length() - 1 instead of the string length.(Should work in python2.7+). –  Bakuriu Sep 19 '12 at 12:28
    
@Bakuriu thanks :) –  Andy Hayden Sep 19 '12 at 12:30
    
A one line solution is the best. Thanks! –  Alex Sep 19 '12 at 12:31
    
@Alex (a^b).bit_length()-1 :) –  Andy Hayden Sep 19 '12 at 12:32

Without using bitwise operations you could do something like this:

In [1]: def difbit(a, b):
   ...:     if a == b: return None
   ...:     i = 0
   ...:     while a%2 == b%2:
   ...:         i += 1
   ...:         a //= 2
   ...:         b //= 2
   ...:     return i
   ...: 

In [2]: difbit(0b11111111, 0b11011111)
Out[2]: 5
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unless i am missing something...

this should work:

>>> def find_bit(a,b):
    a = a[::-1]
    b = b[::-1]
    for i in xrange(len(a)):
        if a[i] != b[i]:
            return i
    return None

>>> a = "11111111"
>>> b = "11011111"
>>> find_bit(a,b)
5

maybe not so elegant, but its easy to understand, and it gets the job done.

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