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I recently started digging into C# but I can't by my life figure out how delegates work when implementing the observer/observable pattern in the language.

Could someone give me a super-simple example of how it is done? I have googled this, but all of the examples I found were either too problem-specific or too "bloated".

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5 Answers 5

up vote 92 down vote accepted

The observer pattern is usually implemented with events.

Here's an example:

using System;

class Observable
{
    public event EventHandler SomethingHappened;

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        EventHandler handler = SomethingHappened;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }
}

class Observer
{
    public void HandleEvent(object sender, EventArgs args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Something happened to " + sender);
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Observable observable = new Observable();
        Observer observer = new Observer();
        observable.SomethingHappened += observer.HandleEvent;

        observable.DoSomething();
    }
}

See the linked article for a lot more detail.

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1  
Nice, clear example Jon –  Dan Diplo Aug 8 '09 at 18:27
10  
To save yourself a few lines and avoid the null check, initialize your event like this: stackoverflow.com/questions/340610/… –  Dinah Aug 8 '09 at 20:32
    
@Dinah: That doesn't avoid the null check. You can still set SomethingHappened = null later (a handy if lazy and non-ideal way of unsubscribing all handlers), so the null check is always necessary. –  Dan Puzey Dec 2 '13 at 16:33
2  
@DanPuzey: You can within the class, but equally you can make sure you don't do that - and other code can't do it, as it can only subscribe and unsubscribe. If you ensure that you never set it to null deliberately within you class, it's fine to avoid the null check. –  Jon Skeet Dec 2 '13 at 16:36
    
@JonSkeet: of course, I was forgetting you can't do that outside of the class. Apologies! –  Dan Puzey Dec 2 '13 at 16:40

Here's a simple example:

public class ObservableClass
{
    private Int32 _Value;

    public Int32 Value
    {
        get { return _Value; }
        set
        {
            if (_Value != value)
            {
                _Value = value;
                OnValueChanged();
            }
        }
    }

    public event EventHandler ValueChanged;

    protected void OnValueChanged()
    {
        if (ValueChanged != null)
            ValueChanged(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}

public class ObserverClass
{
    public ObserverClass(ObservableClass observable)
    {
        observable.ValueChanged += TheValueChanged;
    }

    private void TheValueChanged(Object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("Value changed to " +
            ((ObservableClass)sender).Value);
    }
}

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        ObservableClass observable = new ObservableClass();
        ObserverClass observer = new ObserverClass(observable);
        observable.Value = 10;
    }
}

Note:

  • This violates a rule in that I don't unhook the observer from the observable, this is perhaps good enough for this simple example, but make sure you don't keep observers hanging off of your events like that. A way to handle this would be to make ObserverClass IDisposable, and let the .Dispose method do the opposite of the code in the constructor
  • No error-checking performed, at least a null-check should be done in the constructor of the ObserverClass
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I've tied together a couple of the great examples above (thank you as always to Mr. Skeet and Mr. Karlsen) to include a couple of different Observables and utilized an interface to keep track of them in the Observer and allowed the Observer to to "observe" any number of Observables via an internal list:

namespace ObservablePattern
{
    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;

    internal static class Program
    {
        private static void Main()
        {
            var observable = new Observable();
            var anotherObservable = new AnotherObservable();

            using (IObserver observer = new Observer(observable))
            {
                observable.DoSomething();
                observer.Add(anotherObservable);
                anotherObservable.DoSomething();
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    internal interface IObservable
    {
        event EventHandler SomethingHappened;
    }

    internal sealed class Observable : IObservable
    {
        public event EventHandler SomethingHappened;

        public void DoSomething()
        {
            var handler = this.SomethingHappened;

            Console.WriteLine("About to do something.");
            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
            }
        }
    }

    internal sealed class AnotherObservable : IObservable
    {
        public event EventHandler SomethingHappened;

        public void DoSomething()
        {
            var handler = this.SomethingHappened;

            Console.WriteLine("About to do something different.");
            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
            }
        }
    }

    internal interface IObserver : IDisposable
    {
        void Add(IObservable observable);

        void Remove(IObservable observable);
    }

    internal sealed class Observer : IObserver
    {
        private readonly Lazy<IList<IObservable>> observables =
            new Lazy<IList<IObservable>>(() => new List<IObservable>());

        public Observer()
        {
        }

        public Observer(IObservable observable) : this()
        {
            this.Add(observable);
        }

        public void Add(IObservable observable)
        {
            if (observable == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            lock (this.observables)
            {
                this.observables.Value.Add(observable);
                observable.SomethingHappened += HandleEvent;
            }
        }

        public void Remove(IObservable observable)
        {
            if (observable == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            lock (this.observables)
            {
                observable.SomethingHappened -= HandleEvent;
                this.observables.Value.Remove(observable);
            }
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            for (var i = this.observables.Value.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                this.Remove(this.observables.Value[i]);
            }
        }

        private static void HandleEvent(object sender, EventArgs args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Something happened to " + sender);
        }
    }
}
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Check this introduction to Rx Framework which uses wonderful IObserver-IObservable non-blocking asyncronous programming model http://themechanicalbride.blogspot.com/2009/07/introducing-rx-linq-to-events.html

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A fine thing if you use Silverlight - unfortunately not of much use for the rest of us. A shame. –  Jeremy McGee Aug 8 '09 at 19:18
    
You can convert it to .net clr. See here evain.net/blog/articles/2009/07/30/… –  Ray Aug 8 '09 at 19:47
    
Also it will be a part of .NET 4.0 (and not only for Silverlight) –  Ray Aug 8 '09 at 19:49

I did't want to change my source code to add additional observer , so I have written following simple example:

//EVENT DRIVEN OBSERVER PATTERN
public class Publisher
{
    public Publisher()
    {
        var observable = new Observable();
        observable.PublishData("Hello World!");
    }
}

//Server will send data to this class's PublishData method
public class Observable
{
    public event Receive OnReceive;

    public void PublishData(string data)
    {
        //Add all the observer below
        //1st observer
        IObserver iObserver = new Observer1();
        this.OnReceive += iObserver.ReceiveData;
        //2nd observer
        IObserver iObserver2 = new Observer2();
        this.OnReceive += iObserver2.ReceiveData;

        //publish data 
        var handler = OnReceive;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(data);
        }
    }
}

public interface IObserver
{
    void ReceiveData(string data);
}

//Observer example
public class Observer1 : IObserver
{
    public void ReceiveData(string data)
    {
        //sample observers does nothing with data :)
    }
}

public class Observer2 : IObserver
{
    public void ReceiveData(string data)
    {
        //sample observers does nothing with data :)
    }
}
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