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Why is there a difference between the two types of calling method in the following code:

class Access
    def method_missing name
        print "Method is missing"
    end

    protected
    def protected_method
        print "Calling Protected Method"
    end
end

access = Access.new
access.protected_method #Method is missing
access.send(:protected_method) #Calling Protected Method

The access.protected_method works as expected. But the send option tries to call the method even though it's protected. I would like to know what happens internally.

I get a string for the method to be called, so I would like to use send but I do not want to call the protected methods.

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Got the answer here: weblog.jamisbuck.org/2007/2/23/method-visibility-in-ruby Adding for anyone who finds same issue :). –  Kiran Madipally Sep 19 '12 at 13:05
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4 Answers

That's just how send works. Use public_send instead, if you only want to call public methods.

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Oh, didn't know about public_send. Thanks :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 26 '12 at 4:43
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One of the uses of send is to bypass visibility, so this is a feature, not a bug, and in fact you'll probably break the expectations of other programmers using your class if you don't allow this behavior.

That said, if you really need it, you can override send and method_missing in your class to implement the behavior you want:

class Access
  def foo; puts "foo"; end

  def method_missing(message, *args)
    puts "Method #{message} missing"
  end

  def send(message, *args)
    if self.class.protected_instance_methods.include?(message)
      method_missing(message, *args)
    else
      super
    end
  end

protected

  def bar; puts "bar"; end
end

a = Access.new
a.foo            #=> 'foo'
a.bar            #=> 'Method bar missing'
a.send('bar')    #=> 'Method bar missing'
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That's what public_send is for... –  samuil Sep 19 '12 at 13:58
    
Thanks. I wasn't aware of that method. –  Brandan Sep 19 '12 at 14:14
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Using send allows you to bypass some rules, such as accessing protected or private methods of an object.

Another thing is that send allows you to call methods dynamically. Using send will you to decide which methods gets called without knowing it before the program runs, that is you can decide what message will be passed on to it during runtime.

Aside from that, as far as I know, they're the same.

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Well, that's how send works. It allows you to call a method regardless of its visibility. If you send a non-existing name, then method_missing will kick in. See:

class Access
    def method_missing name
        "Method is missing"
    end

    protected
    def protected_method
        "Calling Protected Method"
    end
end

access = Access.new
access.protected_method # => "Method is missing"
access.send(:protected_method) # => "Calling Protected Method"
access.send(:non_existing_method) # => "Method is missing"

If you don't want your protected methods to be called this way, then, I guess, this is a good use case for the dreaded eval.

eval "Access.new.protected_method" # => "Method is missing"
eval "Access.new.non_existing_method" # => "Method is missing"
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Thanks for the quick response. Appreciate it. –  Kiran Madipally Sep 19 '12 at 13:07
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