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I am trying to count across 2 tables and I dont see whats wrong with my query yet I get a wrong result. User 2 does not exist in table_two, so the zero is correct.

SELECT t1.creator_user_id, COUNT(t1.creator_user_id), COUNT(t2.user_id)
FROM table_one AS t1
LEFT JOIN table_two AS t2 ON t2.user_id = t1.creator_user_id
GROUP BY t1.creator_user_id, t2.user_id

Actual result

1 192 192
2 9 0

Expected result

1 16 12
2 9 0

The result indicate a missing group by condition, but I already got both fields used.
Where am I wrong ?

Also, can I sum up all users that doesnt exist in table_two for t1 ? Like user 3 exists 21 times in t1, then the results would be:

1 16 12     (users with > 0 in t2 will need their own row)
2 30 0      (user 2=9 + user 3=21 => 30)

Its okay for the user Id to be wrong for sum of t1 for all users with 0 in t2. If not possible, then I'll just do two queries.

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2 Answers 2

Try this:

SELECT t1.creator_user_id, 
       Count(*), 
       (SELECT Count(*) 
        FROM   table_two 
        WHERE  table_two.user_id = t1.creator_user_id) 
FROM   table_one AS t1 
GROUP  BY t1.creator_user_id

SQL FIDDLE DEMO

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This works, but if subquerying is the only way then I might as well use 2 queries, which will let me sum t1.creator_user_id where t2.user_id = 0 –  Kim Sep 19 '12 at 13:33
    
I can't find any other way –  Ankur Sep 19 '12 at 14:31
    
and this method is better than join as it doesn't create a temporary table, for eg in join if first table contains 20 rows with userid 1 and table two contains 16 rows with userid 1 then a table would be created with 16*12 rows. –  Ankur Sep 19 '12 at 15:37

If the user has several rows in t2 then also the t1 is displayed for every row in t2. Try grouping with (only) t1.creator_user_id

SELECT t1.creator_user_id, COUNT(t1.creator_user_id), COUNT(t2.user_id)
FROM table_one AS t1
LEFT JOIN table_two AS t2 ON t2.user_id = t1.creator_user_id
GROUP BY t1.creator_user_id

Performance wise two distinct queries could be better.

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I have tried multiple permutations, including this one, of the query without success. Even using the primary keys despite they are not used. I am leaning heavily towards using two queries instead - less worrisome :) –  Kim Sep 19 '12 at 15:57

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