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Can somebody explain to me what the f and t commands do in vim and exactly how they work? I can't seem to find this information but people keep telling me that they are very useful. Would really appreciate an answer with an example if possible, thanks!

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Those that say it's useful, do they not say what it's useful for? –  Shahbaz Sep 19 '12 at 13:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Your first stop with questions like these should be vim's internal help, :h f and :h t. However, in this case, those entries are a bit cryptic without an example. Suppose we had this line (^ = cursor position):

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
^

These commands find characters on a line. So fb would place the cursor here:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
          ^

t is like f but places the cursor on the preceding character. So tb would give you:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
         ^

You can remember these commands as find and till. Also, you can prepend the commands with a number to move to the nth occurrence of that character. For example, 3fb would move to the third b to the right of the cursor. My example sentence only has one b though, so the cursor wouldn't move at all.

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Thanks a lot, that was perfect, I totally forgot about the :h command this is my first week using Vim, this was a huge help thanks! –  user1023465 Sep 19 '12 at 13:52
    
While doing 'fb', I am taken to b(rown). How would I directly get to b(r)own? Is there a way, without hjkl? –  dscy-prsm Jul 21 at 14:33
    
The command is f, with b as its target. fr will take you to the r in brown. –  Michael Kristofik Jul 21 at 14:51

I find f and t very useful in combination with d and c. For example, ct: will let you replace everything from your cursor up to the next colon, but not delete the colon. You can remember it as "change to colon".

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+1! Idioms like ct, or ct)to quickly replace one or last argument to a function call feel wonderful to use. –  progo Sep 20 '12 at 9:04
    
I prefer vt:c because you don't spot always spot each occurrence of a given letter 100% correct. With v you can see the visual selection, a nice visual cue. –  Bentley4 Nov 27 '13 at 19:00

Just to add to @MichaelKristofik's answer, no description of f or t is complete without also mentioning ;.

From this Vim cheat sheet:

; "Repeat latest f, t, F or T [count] times."

So, to continue the @MichaelKristofik's theme:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
^

type fo to go to the first 'o':

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
            ^

and then ; to go to the next one:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
                 ^
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fx jumps to the next x on the line.

tx jumps to the character just before the next x on the line.

You can use Fx and Tx to reach the previous x.

You can use 2fx to jump to the second x on the line.

So, fFand tT are useful when you want to go quickly to the next set of parentheses (f() or delete everything from the cursor to, but excluding, the previous = (dT=) and so on…

See :h motion.txt. It will blow your mind.

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