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I am learning ruby from 'Programming ruby 1.9'. I am learning to use the ruby-debug so I can understand what is going on underneath. I use rubymine since it integrates ruby-debug19 or something like that (it says I don't have the gem and installs it). Here is the question, I was able to step through the code and explore the variables and the stack. However, when it reaches a for i in 0...5, the debugger says

stack frame not available

I know that ruby don't use for loops much but I'd still like to know if there debug through for loops.

Code:

    raw_text  = %{
The problem breaks down into two parts. First, given some text as a
string, return a list of words. That sounds like an array. Then, build a 
count for each distinct word. That sounds like a use for a hash---we can 
index it with the word and use the corresponding entry to keep a count.}

word_list = words_from_string(raw_text)
counts    = count_frequency(word_list)
sorted    = counts.sort_by {|word, count| count}
top_five  = sorted.last(5)

for i in 0...5            # (this is ugly code--read on
  word = top_five[i][0]   #  for a better version)
  count = top_five[i][1]
  puts "#{word}:  #{count}"
end
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1 Answer 1

If you take a look at the Ruby Language Specification (clause 11.5.2.3.4 on p. 91), you will see that

for i in 0...5
  word = top_five[i][0]
  count = top_five[i][1]
  puts "#{word}:  #{count}"
end

is syntactic sugar for

(0...5).each do |i|
  word = top_five[i][0]
  count = top_five[i][1]
  puts "#{word}:  #{count}"
end

except that no new variable scope is created for the block. So, the code with for will be translated into the code with each and executed as if it were written that way, except that the variables used in the for loop leak into the surrounding scope.

To put it another way: for actually executes each but without allocating a new stack frame for the block. So, the error message is exactly right: there is a call to a block, but somehow there is no stack frame allocated for that block call. That obviously confuses the debugger.

Now, one might argue that this is a bug and that for loops should get special treatment inside the debugger. I guess that so far nobody has ever bothered to fix that bug, since nobody ever uses for loops, precisely because they leak their variables into the surrounding scope and are exactly equivalent to an idiomatic each which doesn't.

What do I mean by "leaking variables"? See here:

(1..2).each do |i|
  t = true
end

i
# NameError: undefined local variable or method `i' for main:Object

t
# NameError: undefined local variable or method `t' for main:Object

for i in 1..2
  t = true
end

i
# => 2

t
# => true
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Thanks for the answer. I was actually hoping to know how to debug and know the values in the variables such that (1..2).each do |i| and i would be able to debug through and see the value i or other vars changing while using the debugger. What you explained was indeed fascinating and educational. THanks :) –  Yko Sep 22 '12 at 13:05
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