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I have defined prototype for Array indexOf ( to support array indexOf in Internet Explorer )

if(!Array.prototype.indexOf){
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function(obj){
        for(var i=0; i<this.length; i++){
            if(this[i]==obj){
               return i;
            }
         }
         return -1;
     }
}

When I am creating array with values [1,2,3], this indexOf code snippet added into the Array like below

["1","2","3",function(obj){for(var i=0;i<this.length;i++){if(this[i]==obj){return i;}}return -1;}]

This problem happens only in IE.

Can anyone help me to resolve this issue. Thanks in advance.


I didn't use for...in loop anywhere, for this I am using jQuery sortable toArray method .sortable("toArray");.

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2  
Assuming I've understood your question correctly, I guess you're iterating over an array with a for...in loop (which will enumerate inherited properties). Change it to a normal for loop. –  James Allardice Sep 19 '12 at 13:30
    
@JamesAllardice i see no for...in loops, but you're probably correct - the prototype getting attached as an element in the array is a symptom of using for...in. –  jbabey Sep 19 '12 at 13:39
1  
This is not your issue, but you should use this[i]===obj (strict equality) in your equality test. Otherwise, [5].indexOf("5") will produce a match when it shouldn't (one is a number, one is a string). –  apsillers Sep 19 '12 at 13:42
1  
@jbabey - I'm assuming the question is "why does it seem like this function is in my array". And I'm assuming the reason for that is that somewhere a for...in is being used to iterate over an array. Not sure if that's the actual question or not (Elias Van Ootegem's answer suggests that he read it differently). –  James Allardice Sep 19 '12 at 13:42
    
@JamesAllardice absolutely right. i edited my comment after re-reading the question. –  jbabey Sep 19 '12 at 13:44

3 Answers 3

I am assuming that at some point you are using a for...in loop to iterate over the elements of your array. For example:

for (var elem in myArray) {
    //Do stuff...
}

A for...in loop will enumerate all enumerable properties of an object, including those it has inherited from it's ancestors in its prototype chain. You've added a method to the Array prototype:

Array.prototype.indexOf = function(obj){ //...

This property is enumerable (you can't define non-enumerable properties - see Object.defineProperty - in older versions of IE), so a for...in loop will include this property.

The simple solution is to never use a for...in loop to iterate over an array! Use a normal for loop instead.

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As the comments above note, it looks like the OP is using an inspector that is using for...in, which he has no control over. So using Object.defineProperty is the correct solution, but as you correctly note, it won't work in older versions of IE. :-( –  Pete Sep 19 '12 at 13:53
    
@james-allardice - I didn't use for...in loop anywhere, for this I am using jQuery sortable toArray method ( .sortable("toArray"); ). –  john Sep 19 '12 at 14:15
    
@john@JamesAllardice: The OP specified what he did: this indexOf code snippet added into the Array like below, and shows an array of string constants, followed by an anonymous function. Am I really the only one who thinks that the question actually is Why is indexOf still not working in IE? Anyway, I've asked the OP to be more specific about this, but meanwhile, I seem to be the only one who noticed that the OP didn't augment the prototype, but merely created some function –  Elias Van Ootegem Sep 19 '12 at 15:29
    
@EliasVanOotegem - I think you've misunderstood the question. "When I am creating array with values [1,2,3]" and the fact that the code in the array is the value of Array.prototype.indexOf after augmentation (it's not the entire snippet at the top of the question) indicate that actually the OP is augmenting Array.prototype correctly, but is confused as to why he now appears to have a function in his array (which should be [1,2,3]). But as you said, the question needs clarification :) –  James Allardice Sep 19 '12 at 15:34
1  
@JamesAllardice: I'm indeed beginning to doubt if I understood the question correctly, but it doesn't make sense... I have to use IE8 at work, and augment prototypes all the time. Never, ever have I encountered this behaviour. It just doesn't add up. But then again, augmenting native prototypes and using libs like jQuery might not always be the best of ideas... –  Elias Van Ootegem Sep 19 '12 at 15:42

Your problem is that your new indexOf() method is marked "enumerable." Unfortunately, there is no fix for this in IE7 or non-standards-mode IE8. But you can at least patch the issue for standards mode IE8 by using some ES5 trickery. Modify your code to look like this and it should get rid of the extra element if you're in IE8 standards mode:

(function () {
    var indexOfFn = function(obj){
        for(var i=0; i<this.length; i++){
            if(this[i]==obj){
               return i;
            }
         }
         return -1;
    };

    if(!Array.prototype.indexOf){
        if(typeof Object.defineProperty === "function") {
            Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "indexOf", {
                value: indexOfFn,
                enumerable: false
            });
        } else {
            Array.prototype.indexOf = indexOfFn;
        }
    }
}());

I know it's wordy, so it might not be worth the effort. But it will also protect your JavaScript from other people's bad coding where they might end up using an Array with a for-in loop.

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It's quite simple, you're array now contains 4 elements, of which the forth is a function object, you're not defining a new method for the array object, let alone all array objects. Just paste the first snippet at the very top of your script, then:

 var foo = [1,2,3];
 alert(foo.indexOf(2));//alerts 1

Think of Array.prototype as the template of every array. Whenever you try to access some property or method of an array, that isn't defined, rather then throwing errors, JS will first check the Array.prototype if that object doesn't have that method/property. If it does, JS will use that code, and apply it to the array that initially called it. In the above example foo.indexOf(2) could have been written as Array.prototype.indexOf.apply(foo,[2]);. In other words: JS automatically applied the function of the prototype to foo.

Your "full" code should look like this:

if(!Array.prototype.indexOf)
{
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function(obj)
    {
        for(var i=0; i<this.length; i++)
        {
            if(this[i] === obj)//preferable, use strict comparison
            {
                return i;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    };
}
var yourArray = [1,2,3,4,'4'];
alert(yourArray.indexOf(4));//alerts 3
alert(yourArray.indexOf('4'));//alerts 4 when using strict comparison, if not, alerts 3

Here's a fiddle, checked in IE8, and it's working just fine

Just google prototypal inheritance and prototype chains or augmenting prototypes in JS and the like, read up and be baffled! ;)

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