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I keep running into this problem. And right now it has to do with the Date object

var now = new Date();
var later = new Date();
later.setHours( later.getHours() + 8 );

<Wait for somthing>
now = later;
later.setHours( later.getHours() + 8 );

alert(now == later); //returns True

I thought this could be solved using callbacks:

var adjustTime = function(callback){
     now = later;
     callback();
}
adjustTime(function(){
    later.setHours( later.getHours() + 8 );
});

alert(now == later); //returns True

What do I not understand? How can I update these variables correctly?

EDIT: Ok, I should explained myself a bit better. What I want to do is to update the now variable to be the value of later. And after that I want to increase later with 8 hours.

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What is 'wait for something'? –  Jeroen Moons Sep 19 '12 at 13:42
    
Can you explain more what you're trying to accomplish? –  Sam Sep 19 '12 at 13:42
    
I think you're just expecting behavior different from the way JavaScript actually works. The examples you gave are not at all surprising to someone experienced with JavaScript. Perhaps you could explain what you expected to happen and why the actual behavior is confusing you. –  Pointy Sep 19 '12 at 13:46
    
Also that callback example will result in a runtime exception, because you're not actually passing a function to the "adjustTime" routine. It makes no difference however because after setting a variable to the value of another, they'll be equal, as your alert() demonstrates. –  Pointy Sep 19 '12 at 13:47
    
OK I updated my answer - the key is that you need to create a brand new Date object for either "now" or "later". –  Pointy Sep 19 '12 at 13:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Equality comparisons between Date instances just tests for object reference equality. And in any case, once you've done this:

now = later;

then the variables "now" and "later" reference the same object. Updates to "later" are therefore updates to "now".

The "setter" methods on the Date prototype all modify the object directly. That is, Date instances are not immutable.

edit — I'm going to guess that what you really want is to keep "now" and "later" separate. In that case, something like this is probably what you want:

now = later;
later = new Date(later.getTime());
later.setHours(later.getHours() + 8);

After that, "now" and "later" won't be equal because you'll have set it to a new Date instance.

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Perfect. I guess it was the reference part that confused me. Thanks a lot! –  kimpettersen Sep 19 '12 at 13:57

After now = later; change in later will reflect in now and vise-verse. as both are same object

   var now = new Date();
    var later = new Date();
    later.setHours( later.getHours() + 8 );

    <Wait for somthing>
    now = later; //  now and later have refeerence of same object 
    later.setHours( later.getHours() + 8 );

    alert(now == later); //returns True
share|improve this answer
    
You just copied and pasted the code example with an added comment. Can you explain your answer? If you modify later by calling setHours(), why are they still equal? –  Chris Francis Sep 19 '12 at 13:45
    
Cheers for the update! :) –  Chris Francis Sep 19 '12 at 13:47

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