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In an effort to debug a problem in some C code I wrote, I am examining a some assembly code generated by the IAR AVR compiler. At the top of the .s90 file there are several functions declared. Each function delcaration has the following form:

PUBLIC FunctionName1
FUNCTION FunctionName1,021201H
ARGFRAME CSTACK, 0, STACK
LOCFRAME RSTACK, 2, STACK

Does anyone know what the ARGFRAME AND LOCFRAME directives do? They are only briefly mentioned in the IAR EWAVR Assembler Reference. Sometimes I see the functions declared using RSTACK as a parameter of ARGFRAME instead of CSTACK:

PUBLIC FunctionName2
FUNCTION FunctionName2,021201H
ARGFRAME RSTACK, 0, STACK
LOCFRAME RSTACK, 2, STACK

Anyone know the reasoning behind using RSTACK vs CSTACK with ARGFRAME?

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1 Answer 1

As I'm sure you know already, CSTACK is generally used as the parameter stack, and RSTACK in the return address stack. In the case you've outlined above, there are no parameters. So it's safe to use RSTACK in the directive, since it isn't actually going to store anything there.

As far as what they actually do, it seems like they help reserve space in the correct locations. ARGFRAME and LOCFRAME can point to stack locations, or static areas if the function doesn't need to be reentrant. It seems like an abstraction about how that's done exactly. It's been a long time since I've used IAR's AVR compiler... I don't remember having this facility 10 years ago, so I'm sorry I can't help more on that front.

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