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I am currently using BitConverter to package two unsigned shorts inside a signed int. This code executes millions of times for different values and I am thinking the code could be optimized further. Here is what I am currently doing -- you can assume the code is C#/NET.

// to two unsigned shorts from one signed int:
int xy = 343423;
byte[] bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(xy);
ushort m_X = BitConverter.ToUInt16(bytes, 0);
ushort m_Y = BitConverter.ToUInt16(bytes, 2);

// convet two unsigned shorts to one signed int
byte[] xBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(m_X);
byte[] yBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(m_Y);
byte[] bytes = new byte[] {
   xBytes[0],
   xBytes[1],
   yBytes[0],
   yBytes[1],
 };
 return BitConverter.ToInt32(bytes, 0);

So it occurs to me that I can avoid the overhead of constructing arrays if I bitshift. But for the life of me I can't figure out what the correct shift operation is. My first pathetic attempt involved the following code:

int xy = 343423;
const int mask = 0x00000000;
byte b1, b2, b3, b4;
b1 = (byte)((xy >> 24));
b2 = (byte)((xy >> 16));
b3 = (byte)((xy >> 8) & mask);
b4 = (byte)(xy & mask);
ushort m_X = (ushort)((xy << b4) | (xy << b3));
ushort m_Y = (ushort)((xy << b2) | (xy << b1));

Could someone help me? I am thinking I need to mask the upper and lower bytes before shifting. Some of the examples I see include subtraction with type.MaxValue or an arbitrary number, like negative twelve, which is pretty confusing.

** Update **

Thank you for the great answers. Here are the results of a benchmark test:

// 34ms for bit shift with 10M operations
// 959ms for BitConverter with 10M operations

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();

        stopWatch.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            ushort x = (ushort)i;
            ushort y = (ushort)(i >> 16);
            int result = (y << 16) | x;
        }
        stopWatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine((int)stopWatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");

        stopWatch.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            byte[] bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(i);
            ushort x = BitConverter.ToUInt16(bytes, 0);
            ushort y = BitConverter.ToUInt16(bytes, 2);

            byte[] xBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(x);
            byte[] yBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(y);
            bytes = new byte[] {
                xBytes[0],
                xBytes[1],
                yBytes[0],
                yBytes[1],
            };
            int result = BitConverter.ToInt32(bytes, 0);
        }
        stopWatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine((int)stopWatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + "ms");


        Console.ReadKey();
    }
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The simplest way is to do it using two shifts:

int xy = -123456;
// Split...
ushort m_X = (ushort) xy;
ushort m_Y = (ushort)(xy>>16);
// Convert back...
int back = (m_Y << 16) | m_X;

Demo on ideone: link.

share|improve this answer
    
more bitty than mine. +1 –  spender Sep 19 '12 at 15:09
    
The cast to uint isn't necessary in this case because you're dropping the sign-extended bits when you cast to ushort. –  LukeH Sep 19 '12 at 15:13
    
@LukeH You're right, I edited the answer to drop the unnecessary cast. –  dasblinkenlight Sep 19 '12 at 15:20
    
Thanks guys. That is really awesome. I'll benchmark it here to see how it compares to 1M operations using BitConverter. Will let you know! –  Shaun Sep 19 '12 at 16:04
1  
// 34ms for bit shift with 10M operations // 959ms for BitConverter with 10M operations –  Shaun Sep 19 '12 at 16:15
int xy = 343423;
ushort low = (ushort)(xy & 0x0000ffff);
ushort high = (ushort)((xy & 0xffff0000) >> 16);
int xxyy = low + (((int)high) << 16);
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