Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I understand that with jEditable (http://www.appelsiini.net/projects/jeditable) you can do in-place editing and POST the changed information to a URL.

My ASP.NET MVC view is displaying a bunch of Model information which I'd like to make in-place editable. Currently, I have two views - one text representation and one edit view in which a form is entirely POSTed and then my controller action takes the entire object (assembled from the form element names) as a parameter, updating the object and returning to the text-only view.

However, when I switch to jEditable I would only use the text view and POST a single item at a time, and not the entire object. How could I build a single controller action that can take what jEditable is POSTing and then put it into the appropriate property of my object?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There's some pretty good sample code here:

$("#myTextBox").editable('<%=Url.Action("UpdateSettings","Admin") %>', {   
           submit: 'ok',   
           cancel: 'cancel',   
           cssclass: 'editable',   
           width: '99%',   
           placeholder: 'emtpy',   
           indicator: "<img src='../../Content/img/indicator.gif'/>"  
       });  


[AcceptVerbs("POST")]   
public ActionResult UpdateSettings(string id, string value)   
{   
    // This highly-specific example is from the original coder's blog system,
    // but you can substitute your own code here.  I assume you can pick out
    // which text field it is from the id.
    foreach (var item in this.GetType().GetProperties())   
    {   

        if (item.Name.ToLower().Equals(id, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))   
            item.SetValue(Config.Instance, value, null);   
    }   
    return Content(value);   
}

You might also need this:
http://noahblu.wordpress.com/2009/06/17/jeditable-note-dont-return-json-and-how-to-return-strings-from-asp-net-mvc-actions/

share|improve this answer
1  
But what if I have a large model, say with 20 properties. Do I need 20 different controller methods? Or if I use a generic id/value parameter pair as in your example, how do I have the value automatically update the right object property? –  Alex Aug 8 '09 at 21:22
    
The original code sample had a loop in it...That must be what the loop is for. I reinstated the loop in the code sample. You might want to review the original blog entry. Do you really have 20 little text editors on your web page? That seems pretty unusual. –  Robert Harvey Aug 8 '09 at 22:24
    
Yes, for editing contact details (name, phone etc.) –  Alex Aug 8 '09 at 22:26
    
You're going to need to do a little work to marry the values you get from the text editors to your database model. This appears to work differently from the standard View Model stuff, so you don't get the automatic model updating for free. –  Robert Harvey Aug 8 '09 at 22:30
1  
You could try using the ID and value to add it to the request object (it's editable, right?). Then call UpdateModel() and pass the object -- let UpdateModel worry about the reflection and all that. –  James S Aug 9 '09 at 9:41

Here is what I am doing through reflection:

View:

$(".edit").editable('<%=Url.Action("UpdateEventData","Event") %>', {
                submitdata: {eventid: <%=Model.EventId %>},
                tooltip: "Click to edit....",
                indicator: "Saving...",
                submit : "Save",
                cancel : "Cancel"
            });

Controller:

public string UpdateEventData(int eventid, string id, string value)
    {
        //load the event
        var evt = Repository.GetEvent(eventid);

        //UpdateModel;
        System.Reflection.PropertyInfo pi = evt.GetType().GetProperty(id);
        if (pi==null)
            return "";
        try
        {

            object newvalue = Concrete.HelperMethods.ChangeType(value, pi.PropertyType);

            pi.SetValue(evt, newvalue, null);
            Repository.Save();

        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //handle errors here
        }

        return pi.GetValue(evt, null).ToString();

    }

The method "HelperMethods.ChangeType" is a more robust version of Convert.ChangeType (so it can handle nullables) that I got from http://aspalliance.com/author.aspx?uId=1026.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.