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I am at my wits end trying to solve this question. I have an image of size of 802 x 76 pixels and found out from code that the printer uses a horizontal resolution of 600 and a vertical resolution of 600.

I would like to estimate the size of the image when it is printed in that printer. Iam using winforms and can see that the e.graphics.Dipx and e.graphics.DipY fields give 96 , which is the screen resoultion.

I can see that since the DPI of the screen and printer are different , some kind of scaling up must be done, however Iam not able to figure out the same.

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Note:on manually taking a printout, I get the height as 3.4 cm and width as 19.9 cms, preplexed as to how this numbers have come –  AnandNagarajan111 Sep 19 '12 at 16:12
    
Try this resource pixelyzer.com/image_size_calculator.html –  bUKaneer Sep 19 '12 at 16:12
    
Hi kaneer, Thanks for the reply but the application doesnot give you the size when printed on a printer. it gives the size using the formulae : imageheight/resolution of printer , which is wrong since the image height is measured on the monitor and not on printer , –  AnandNagarajan111 Sep 19 '12 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

802/600 = 1.33667 inch = 3.39 cm.

You should control the width/height of the image when you draw it. GDI+ also looks at the DPI of the image, I think.

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Hi Yuan , does not help , the point is estimating the size of the image on the printer, Iam not bothered about controlling the width or height. You would agree with me that the image when printed will not come to 3.39 cm, what iam interested in is what is the conversion that causes the image to be displayed as a fixed size when printed ( Something to do with screen resolution to printer resolution, is my guess) –  AnandNagarajan111 Sep 20 '12 at 9:14

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