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Say I have a directory with the following files in it:

Test.bat Test_a.txt Test_b.txt Test_v1.zip Test_v2.zip Test_v3.zip

I want to delete all Test_v*.zip quietly (no error messages logged to screen). I can achieve this with the following script:

@ECHO OFF
SET OLD_ZIPS=^
C:\Tmp\Test_v*.txt;^
C:\Tmp\Test_a.txt

ECHO Deleting the following files: %OLD_ZIPS%

FOR %%Y IN (%OLD_ZIPS%) DO (
IF EXIST %%Y (
ECHO  Deleting %%Y
DEL /Q %%Y)
)

PAUSE

This works fine:

Deleting the following files: C:\Tmp\Test_v*.txt;C:\Tmp\Test_a.txt
Deleting "C:\Tmp\Test_v1.txt"
Deleting "C:\Tmp\Test_v2.txt"
Deleting "C:\Tmp\Test_a.txt"
Press any key to continue . . .

Unless of course the file paths contain spaces. So in the example above, if I change C:\Tmp\Test_v*.txt to C:\Tmp with spaces\Test_v*.txt I get:

Deleting the following files: C:\Tmp test\Test_v*.txt;C:\Tmp test\Test_a.txt
Press any key to continue . . .

How can I stop it baulking at the spaces?

Edit - I've tried spaces as per Alex K's answer (plus a little more debug) and it looks like perhaps the for loop isn't splitting things up as I expect:

@ECHO OFF
SET OLD_ZIPS=^
C:\Tmp test\Test_v*.txt;^
C:\Tmp test\Test_a.txt

ECHO Deleting the following files: %OLD_ZIPS%

FOR %%Y IN (%OLD_ZIPS%) DO (
ECHO  Checking existance of "%%Y"
IF EXIST "%%Y" (
ECHO  Deleting "%%Y"
DEL /Q "%%Y")
)

PAUSE

..gives me:

Deleting the following files: C:\Tmp test\Test_v*.txt;C:\Tmp test\Test_a.txt
 Checking existance of "C:\Tmp"
 Checking existance of "C:\Tmp"
 Checking existance of "test\Test_a.txt"
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The function needs to loop over each line individually, so you need to quote the variable in the FOR loop, tokenize it on the semicolons, rinse and repeat.

@ECHO OFF
SET OLD_ZIPS=^
C:\tmp with spaces\Test_v*.txt;^
C:\tmp\Test_a.txt

ECHO Deleting the following files: %OLD_ZIPS%

:deleteFiles
for /f "tokens=1* delims=;" %%A in ("%OLD_ZIPS%") do (
    ECHO  Checking existance of "%%A"
    IF EXIST "%%A" (
        ECHO  Deleting "%%A"
        DEL /Q "%%A"
    )
    set OLD_ZIPS=%%B
)
if not "%OLD_ZIPS%" == "" goto :deleteFiles

PAUSE
share|improve this answer
    
Nice work Kevin; that worked a treat! I tried the tokens / delims bit but I was using tokens=* and didn't get the right answer.. –  Jon Cage Sep 20 '12 at 8:33

seems you are trying to over complicate things.

for %a in ("C:\Tmp with spaces\Test_v*.txt" "C:\Tmp\Test_a.txt") do del /q "%a"

does what you want, and can be typed from the command line. change %a to %%a if you want to do it in a batch file

share|improve this answer

Weirdly, this seems to work. I have editted my version to look like yours so please try and amend any syntax errors ;-)

@ECHO OFF
SET OLD_ZIPS="C:\Tmp with spaces\Test_v*.txt";^
"C:\Tmp with spaces\Test_a.txt";

ECHO Deleting the following files: %OLD_ZIPS%

FOR %%Y IN (%OLD_ZIPS%) DO (
IF EXIST %%Y (
ECHO  Deleting %%Y
DEL /Q %%Y)
)

PAUSE
share|improve this answer
    
Try again with spaces in the path name... –  Jon Cage Sep 19 '12 at 16:57
    
It does work. I mistakingly pasted your paths without spaces back in. The paths on my machine when I tested had spaces. It's the quotes on the paths that make the difference with spaces. It doesn't seem to work with ^ directly after the ZIPS= though. I've updated the paths now. –  Nanook Sep 24 '12 at 8:57
    
I get: Deleting the following files: "C:\Tmp test\Test_v*.txt";"C:\Tmp test\Test_a.txt"; Deleting C:\Tmp test\Test_v1.txt The system cannot find the file specified. Deleting C:\Tmp test\Test_v2.txt The system cannot find the file specified. Deleting "C:\Tmp test\Test_a.txt" and neither Test_v1.txt nor Test_v2.txt get deleted. I'm running on windows 7 if that makes a difference? –  Jon Cage Sep 24 '12 at 9:29

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