Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two options that I am trying to filter between now, but will be adding in a third and maybe a fourth later on (for example: right now I am filtering between prices and reviews but will want to add more prices to the list and also another filter category like "rating" which would consist of 3, 4, or 5 stars).

Using the logic that I have listed below works fine, but I feel it will get really long and complicated (and unnecessary) as I go. I know there is a way to refactor the code I'm just wondering what the best way to go about it would be? HTML:

  <select class="deals">
    <option value="deals-all">All deals</option>
    <option value="50">$50</option>
    <option value="25">$25</option>
  </select>

  <select class="reviews">
    <option value="reviews-all">All reviews</option>
    <option value="reviews-positive">Positive reviews</option>
    <option value="reviews-negative">Negative reviews</option>
  </select>

jQuery

 $('.reviews, .deals').change(function() {

var reviewsVal = $('.reviews :selected').val();
var dealsVal = $('.deals :selected').val();



 if((reviewsVal == 'reviews-all') && (dealsVal == 'deals-all')) {

      $('.review-positive').show();
 $('.review-negative').show();
 $('.deals-25').show();
 $('.deals-50').show();
 } 


else if((dealsVal == '50') && (reviewsVal == 'reviews-positive')) {
 $('.review-negative.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-50').show();
 $('.review-negative.deals-25').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-25').hide();

 }

 else if((dealsVal == '50') && (reviewsVal == 'reviews-negative')) {
 $('.review-negative.deals-50').show();
 $('.review-positive.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-negative.deals-25').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-25').hide();
 }

else if((dealsVal == '25') && (reviewsVal == 'reviews-positive')) {
 $('.review-negative.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-negative.deals-25').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-25').show();
}

else if((dealsVal == '25') && (reviewsVal == 'reviews-negative')) {
 $('.review-negative.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-negative.deals-25').show();
 $('.review-positive.deals-25').hide();
}

 else if((dealsVal == 'deals-all') && (reviewsVal == 'reviews-positive')) {
 $('.review-negative.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-50').show();
 $('.review-negative.deals-25').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-25').show();
}

else if((dealsVal == 'deals-all') && (reviewsVal == 'reviews-negative')) {
 $('.review-negative.deals-50').show();
 $('.review-positive.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-negative.deals-25').show();
 $('.review-positive.deals-25').hide();
}

else if((dealsVal == '50') && (reviewsVal == 'reviews-all')) {
 $('.review-negative.deals-50').show();
 $('.review-positive.deals-50').show();
 $('.review-negative.deals-25').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-25').hide();
}

else if((dealsVal == '25') && (reviewsVal == 'reviews-all')) {
 $('.review-negative.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-positive.deals-50').hide();
 $('.review-negative.deals-25').show();
 $('.review-positive.deals-25').show();
}

else {
 $('.review-positive').show();
 $('.review-negative').show();
 $('.deals-25').show();
 $('.deals-50').show();
} 
});

$('.reviews-positive').click(function() {
$('.review-negative').hide();
$('.review-positive').show();
});

$('.reviews-negative').click(function() {
$('.review-positive').hide();
$('.review-negative').show();
});


});​

Hopefully you can see what I am going for, thanks for any input.

*EDIT: jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/TXywp/1/

share|improve this question
    
Can you post a jsFiddle for a requiremnet.. that can be easier to work on –  Sushanth -- Sep 19 '12 at 16:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To get a dynamic result a standardized naming is the best way to go. You start by standardizing the criteria selectors, giving them a general class and differentiating with id properties. Following a naming convetion for values is also recommended. This would produce something in the lines of

    <select id="deal" class="criteriaSelector">
      <option value="all">All deals</option>
      <option value="50">$50</option>
      <option value="25">$25</option>
    </select>

    <select id="review" class="criteriaSelector">
      <option value="all">All reviews</option>
      <option value="positive">Positive reviews</option>
      <option value="negative">Negative reviews</option>
    </select>

Then you give all the items you want to filter a generic class besides the filtering classes. I will use .item as an example. You will also want to be able to construct the class from selected value and criteria name so using the .{id}-{value} system will work perfectly. This will leave us with something in the lines of

    <div class="item review-positive deal-25"></div>
    <div class="item review-negative deal-50"></div>

This setup will allow us to build dynamic and extensible code:

    $('.criteriaSelector').change(function() {
      // Initialize criteria string
      var criteria = '';
      // Set value for all selector
      var showAll = true;

      // Iterate over all criteriaSelectors
      $('.criteriaSelector').each(function(){
        // Get value
        var val = $(this).children(':selected').val();
        // Check if this limits our results
        if(val !== 'all'){
          // Append selector to criteria
          criteria += '.' + $(this).attr('id') + '-' + val;
          // We don't want to show all results anymore
          showAll = false;
        }
      });
      // Check if results are limited somehow
      if(showAll){
        // No criterias were set so show all
        $('.item').show();
      } else {
        // Hide all items
        $('.item').hide();
        // Show the ones that were selected
        $(criteria).show();
      }

    });

Now adding a new criteria selector won't require changes in this piece of code as long as naming conventions are followed.

share|improve this answer
    
Here it is in action: jsfiddle.net/4Zxaq/2 –  Will Sep 19 '12 at 19:16

I can think of two different approaches to simplify the code and make it easier to maintain and grow:

  1. You can algorithmically derive what items should be hidden or shown based on the conditions.

  2. You can create a table of conditions and actions so that adding a new condition and action is just adding a new item to the table.

  3. Change your HTML to make it self-describing for what it should display.

Here's what the table driven approach looks like:

$('.reviews, .deals').change(function() {

    var allDeals = '.review-negative.deals-50, .review-positive.deals-50, .review-positive.deals-25, .review-negative.deals-25';

    var table = [
        {rv: 'reviews-all', dv: 'deals-all', show: '.review-positive, .review-negative, .deals-25, .deals-50'},
        {rv: 'reviews-positive', dv: '50', show: '.review-positive.deals-50'},
        {rv: 'reviews-negative', dv: '50', show: '.review-negative.deals-50'},
        {rv: 'reviews-positive', dv: '25', show: '.review-positive.deals-25'}
        {rv: 'reviews-negative', dv: '25', show: '.review-negative.deals-25'},
        {rv: 'reviews-positive', dv: 'deals-all', show: '.review-positive.deals-50, .review-positive.deals-25'},
        {rv: 'reviews-negative', dv: 'deals-all', show: '.review-negative.deals-50, .review-negative.deals-25'},
        {rv: 'reviews-all', dv: '50', show: '.review-negative.deals-50, .review-positive.deals-50'},
        {rv: 'reviews-all', dv: '25', show: '.review-negative.deals-25, .review-positive.deals-25'}
    ];

    var reviewsVal = $('.reviews :selected').val();
    var dealsVal = $('.deals :selected').val();

    $(allDeals).hide();

    var item, found = false;
    for (var i = 0, len = table.length; i < len; i++) {
        item = table[i];
        if (dealsVal == item.dv && reviewsVal == item.rv) {
            $(item.show).show();
            found = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (!found) {
        $('.review-positive, .review-negative, .deals-25, .deals-50').show();
    } 
});

And, here's an algorithmic way that lets you add a new deal value by just adding one new entry to an array. With only two deals, this is probably more work than the table driven approach, but if you had 4 or more deal levels, this would a lot simpler to maintain.

$('.reviews, .deals').change(function() {
    var deals = ['25', '50'];

    function addAllDeals(base, prefix) {
        for (var i = 0; i < deals.length; i++) {
            if (base) base += ", ";
            base += prefix + deals[i];
        }
        return(base);
    }

    function addSingleDeal(prefixes, deal) {
        var sel = [];
        for (var i = 0; i < prefixes.length; i++) {
            sel.push(prefixes[i] + deal);
        }
        return(sel.join(", ");
    }

    var reviewsVal = $('.reviews :selected').val();
    var dealsVal = $('.deals :selected').val();
    var itemsToShow = "";

    // hide everything to start
    var initialHide = addAllDeals("", ".review-positive.deals-");
    initialHide = addAllDeals(initialHide, ".review-negative.deals-");
    $(initialHide).hide();

    if (reviewsVal == 'reviews-all') {
        if (dealsVal == 'deals-all') {
            itemsToShow = addAllDeals(".review-positive, .review-negative", ".deals-");
        } else {
            itemsToShow = addSingleDeal([".review-negative.deals-", ".review-negative.deals-"], dealsVal);
        }
    } else if (reviewsVal == 'reviews-positive') {
        itemsToShow = '.review-positive.deals-' + dealsVal;
    } else if (reviewVal == 'reviews-negative') {
        itemsToShow = '.review-negative.deals-' + dealsVal;
    } else {
        itemsToShow = addAllDeals(".review-positive, .review-negative", ".deals-");
    }
});

If you can change your HTML (as in my third option above) to this:

  <select class="deals">
    <option value="deals-all" data-base=".review-positive, .review-negative">All deals</option>
    <option value="50" data-base=".deals-50">$50</option>
    <option value="25" data-base=".deals-25">$25</option>
  </select>

  <select class="reviews">
    <option value="reviews-all" data-filter="">All reviews</option>
    <option value="reviews-positive" data-filter=".review-positive">Positive reviews</option>
    <option value="reviews-negative" data-filter=".review-negative">Negative reviews</option>
  </select>

Then, you can just use this simple javascript:

 $('.reviews, .deals').change(function() {

    var dealsBase = $('.deals :selected').data("base");
    var reviewsFilter = $('.reviews :selected').data("filter");

     // hide all
     $(".review-negative, .review-positive").hide();

     // show the desired ones
     var base = $(dealsBase);
     if (reviewsFilter) {
         base = base.filter(reviewsFilter);
     }
     base.show();
});

Caveat: Since you did not provide a working jsFiddle example of your code/HTML to try this with, this code has not been run or checked for typing errors. But, hopefully you get the idea of the two approaches.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your input! here is the jsfiddle: jsfiddle.net/84s6g –  Will Sep 19 '12 at 18:46
    
@SarahM - I added a third option that is even simpler. In it, you make the options self describing for what they should show/filter so the code doesn't have to do that work. –  jfriend00 Sep 19 '12 at 19:10
    
jfriend, this is great thanks so much for your help and input. Both responses work excellent. –  Will Sep 19 '12 at 19:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.