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I am working with an existing site and I came across the following MySQL query that needs optimization:

select
    mo.mmrrc_order_oid,
    mo.completed_by_email,
    mo.completed_by_name,
    mo.completed_by_title,
    mo.order_submission_oid,
    mo.order_dt,
    mo.center_id,
    mo.po_num_tx,
    mo.mod_dt,
    ste_s.state_cd,
    group_concat(distinct osr.status_cd order by osr.status_cd) as test,
    case group_concat(distinct osr.status_cd order by osr.status_cd)
        when 'Fulfilled' then 'Fulfilled'
        when 'Fulfilled,N/A' then 'Fulfilled'
        when 'N/A' then 'N/A'
        when 'Pending' then 'Pending'
        else 'In Process'
    end as restriction_status,
    max(osr.closed_dt) as restriction_update_dt,
    ot.milestone,
    ot.completed_dt as tracking_update_dt,
    dc.first_name,
    dc.last_name,
    inst.institution_name,
    order_search.products as products_ordered,
    mo.other_emails,
    mo.customer_label,
    mo.grant_numbers
from
    t_mmrrc_order mo
    join ste_state ste_s using(state_id)
    left join t_order_contact oc 
        on oc.mmrrc_order_oid=mo.mmrrc_order_oid and oc.role_cd='Recipient'
    left join t_distrib_cont_instn dci using(distrib_cont_instn_oid)
    left join t_institution inst using(institution_oid)
    left join t_distribution_contact dc using(distribution_contact_oid)
    left join t_order_tracking ot 
        on ot.mmrrc_order_oid=mo.mmrrc_order_oid 
            and ifnull(ot.order_tracking_oid, '0000-00-00')= ifnull(
                (
                select max(order_tracking_oid) 
                from t_order_tracking ot3 
                where 
                    ot3.mmrrc_order_oid=mo.mmrrc_order_oid 
                    and ot3.completed_dt= (
                            select max(completed_dt) 
                            from t_order_tracking ot2 
                            where ot2.mmrrc_order_oid=mo.mmrrc_order_oid
                        )
                ), '0000-00-00')
    left join t_order_strain_restriction osr 
        on osr.mmrrc_order_oid = mo.mmrrc_order_oid
    left join order_search on order_search.mmrrc_order_oid=mo.mmrrc_order_oid
group by
    mo.mmrrc_order_oid
LIMIT 0, 5

this query takes 10+ seconds to run regardless of the limit. When run without a limit, there are a total of 5,727 results and runtime is 10.624 seconds.

With "LIMIT 0, 5" it took 18.47 seconds.

I understand that there are a bunch of joins and nested selects, which is why it is so slow. Any ideas on how to optimize this without having to change the database structure?

MySQL version: 5.0.95

Most tables have over 10,000 records.

This simpler query takes about 9 seconds:

select
    mo.mmrrc_order_oid,
    mo.completed_by_email,
    mo.completed_by_name,
    mo.completed_by_title,
    mo.order_submission_oid,
    mo.order_dt,
    mo.center_id,
    mo.po_num_tx,
    mo.mod_dt,
    dc.first_name,
    dc.last_name,
    inst.institution_name,
    order_search.products as products_ordered,
    mo.other_emails,
    mo.customer_label,
    mo.grant_numbers
from
    t_mmrrc_order mo
    join ste_state ste_s using(state_id)
    left join t_order_contact oc 
        on oc.mmrrc_order_oid=mo.mmrrc_order_oid and oc.role_cd='Recipient'
    left join t_distrib_cont_instn dci using(distrib_cont_instn_oid)
    left join t_institution inst using(institution_oid)
    left join t_distribution_contact dc using(distribution_contact_oid)
    left join t_order_strain_restriction osr 
        on osr.mmrrc_order_oid = mo.mmrrc_order_oid
    left join order_search on order_search.mmrrc_order_oid=mo.mmrrc_order_oid
group by mo.mmrrc_order_oid
limit 0,5

I suppose the grouping slows it down the most. In this case, without grouping takes only 0.17 seconds. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Additional details - here is what EXPLAIN gives me for the first query: View Image enter image description here

I found that order_search is a view that is causing most of the slow down. The query for the view is:

SELECT 
    t_oi.mmrrc_order_oid AS mmrrc_order_oid,
    group_concat(t_im.icc_item_code separator ',') AS products
FROM 
    t_order_item t_oi
    JOIN t_item_master t_im on t_oi.item_master_oid = t_im.item_master_oid
    JOIN t_strain_archive on t_im.strain_archive_oid = t_strain_archive.strain_archive_oid
WHERE t_oi.item_status_cd IN (_utf8'Active',_utf8'Modified')
GROUP BY t_oi.mmrrc_order_oid
ORDER BY t_im.icc_item_code
share|improve this question
3  
EXPLAIN will be able to tell you a lot more as to why this query is slow than we'll be able to. –  Michael Fredrickson Sep 19 '12 at 17:52
    
Thanks, I have added the output from EXPLAIN. Still not sure how to optimize. –  coder4life Sep 20 '12 at 16:19
    
have you added index on coloumns if added so please post it up –  M Khalid Junaid Sep 24 '12 at 6:14
    
In your view, do you JOIN t_strain_archive just for testing the existence of a corresponding row? And, at least from the point of view of your bigger query (well, actually any other query on the view), the ORDER BY is unnecessary. –  dezso Sep 24 '12 at 17:04
    
And, just for curiosity, why do you (or the author) call the apparent IDs ..._oid? –  dezso Sep 24 '12 at 17:09

2 Answers 2

Just assuming you haven't index the coloumns so i create some indexes for your coloumns this would help you and there are still much coloumns to index like in your join conditions you should apply this operation on that coloumns also for better execution

ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnamemmrrc_order_oid` (`mmrrc_order_oid`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnamecompleted_by_email` (`completed_by_email`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnamecompleted_by_name` (`completed_by_name`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnamecompleted_by_title` (`completed_by_title`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnameorder_submission_oid` (`order_submission_oid`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnameorder_dt` (`order_dt`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnamecenter_id` (`center_id`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnamepo_num_tx` (`po_num_tx`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnamemod_dt` (`mod_dt`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnameother_emails` (`other_emails`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnamecustomer_label` (`customer_label`);
ALTER TABLE `t_mmrrc_order` ADD INDEX `Indexnamegrant_numbers` (`grant_numbers`);
ALTER TABLE `t_distribution_contact ` ADD INDEX `Indexnamefirst_name` (`first_name`);
ALTER TABLE `t_distribution_contact ` ADD INDEX `Indexnamelast_name` (`last_name`);
ALTER TABLE `order_search` ADD INDEX `Indexnameproducts` (`products`);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion. I applied the indexes but it still didn't speedup much. order_search is actually a view and I found that this is what is causing most of the slow down. I will edit the original post and add the order_search view query. –  coder4life Sep 24 '12 at 16:30
4  
Most of your indexes are quite useless, since the columns involved are not in any of the WHERE or JOIN clauses. –  dezso Sep 24 '12 at 17:06
    
@dezso i have added the indexes on the select coloumns read my above answer there are still much coloumns to index like in your join conditions i havent provide all the indexes so read the post carefully first, then comment thanks –  M Khalid Junaid Sep 25 '12 at 4:59
    
There is no use of indexing every column. Normally, the columns which only appear in the SELECT list nedd not to be indexed - unless it is a covering index, but then everything should be in the same compound index. use-the-index-luke.com is a very good reading on how to index and what to index. –  dezso Sep 25 '12 at 5:30
    
@dezso ok i will read the link to increase my knowledge about indexing thanks –  M Khalid Junaid Sep 25 '12 at 5:49
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I managed to solve this problem by doing two separate queries from my PHP script. First, I query the order_search view by itself and save all the data in a PHP array indexed by the mmrrc_order_oid, which then serves as a quick lookup table for products. This resulting lookup table is an array of about about 6000 strings.

Next, I perform the big complex query with order_search table omitted. This only takes about a second now. For each resulting record, I simply use the lookup table by mmrrc_order_oid to get the products for that order.

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