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According to Google Map's Geocode API documentation:

https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/geocoding/index#GeocodingRequests

you can simply make a call to the geocode request address like this:

http://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/geocode/json?address=1600+Amphitheatre+Parkway,+Mountain+View,+CA&sensor=false

However, according to this section, there is a usage limit of 2500 requests per day.

  • Because the request url doesn't contain any type of API key parameter, how is Google tracking the query limit? Is it simply by the client's IP address?
  • I have a Google Maps API v3 key, which says that there is a "Courtesy limit: 25,000 requests/day". Is this something different than the Geocoding API? Or can I somehow use my Google Maps API key with the Geocoding API so that I can potentially do more than 2500 requests per day?
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closed as off topic by casperOne Sep 20 '12 at 15:41

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Why in the world would a question about software API request limits be considered off topic? – Jake Wilson Sep 22 '12 at 19:42
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes it is by ip address.

25,000 is for map loads per day

2,500 is for geocodes per day

If you want more you need to get an account with them and last I checked it cost $10,000 to start.

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Okay if it's by IP address then 2500 is more than fine. Thanks! – Jake Wilson Sep 19 '12 at 18:40

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