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I'm using ElasticSearch along with the tire gem to power the search functionality of my site. I'm having trouble figuring out how to map and query the data to get the results I need.

Relevant code is below. I will explain the desired outbut below that as well.

# models/product.rb

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  include Tire::Model::Search
  include Tire::Model::Callbacks

  has_many :categorizations
  has_many :categories, :through => :categorizations
  has_many :product_traits
  has_many :traits, :through => :product_traits

  mapping do
    indexes :id, type: 'integer'
    indexes :name, boost: 10
    indexes :description, analyzer: 'snowball'
    indexes :categories do
      indexes :id, type: 'integer'
      indexes :name, type: 'string', index: 'not_analyzed'
    end
    indexes :product_traits, type: 'string', index: 'not_analyzed'
  end

  def self.search(params={})

    out = tire.search(page: params[:page], per_page: 12, load: true) do
      query do
        boolean do

          must { string params[:query], default_operator: "OR" } if params[:query].present?
          must { term 'categories.id', params[:category_id] } if params[:category_id].present?

          # if we aren't browsing a category, search results are "drill-down"
          unless params[:category_id].present?
            must { term 'categories.name', params[:categories] } if params[:categories].present?
          end
          params.select { |p| p[0,2] == 't_' }.each do |name,value|
            must { term :product_traits, "#{name[2..-1]}##{value}" }
          end

        end
      end

      # don't show the category facets if we are browsing a category
      facet("categories") { terms 'categories.name', size: 20 } unless params[:category_id].present?
      facet("traits") {
        terms :product_traits, size: 1000 #, all_terms: true
      }

      # raise to_curl
    end

    # process the trait facet results into a hash of arrays
    if out.facets['traits']
      facets = {}
      out.facets['traits']['terms'].each do |f|
        split = f['term'].partition('#')
        facets[split[0]] ||= []
        facets[split[0]] << { 'term' => split[2], 'count' => f['count'] }
      end
      out.facets['traits']['terms'] = facets
    end

    out
  end

  def to_indexed_json
    {
      id: id,
      name: name,
      description: description,
      categories: categories.all(:select => 'categories.id, categories.name, categories.keywords'),
      product_traits: product_traits.includes(:trait).collect { |t| "#{t.trait.name}##{t.value}" }
    }.to_json
  end

end

As you can see above, I'm doing some pre/post processing of the data to/from elasticsearch in order to get what i want from the 'product_traits' field. This is what doesn't feel right and where my questions originate.

I have a large catalog of products, each with a handful of 'traits' such as color, material and brand. Since these traits are so varied, I modeled the data to include a Trait model which relates to the Product model via a ProductTrait model, which holds the value of the trait for the given product.

First question is: How can i create the elasticsearch mapping to index these traits properly? I assume that this involves a nested type but I can't make enough sense of the docs to figure it out.

Second question: I want the facets to come back in groups (in the manner that I am processing them at the end of the search method above) but with counts that reflect how many matches there are without taking into account the currently selected value for each trait. For example: If the user searches for 'Glitter' and then clicks the link corresponding to the 'Blue Color' facet, I want all the 'Color' facets to remain visible and show counts correspinding the query results without the 'Blue Color' filter. I hope that is a good explanation, sorry if it needs more clarification.

share|improve this question
    
Hiya - I'd love to help you, but I don't speak ruby and am not entirely sure what the problem is with your product traits. Could you explain a bit more? –  DrTech Sep 21 '12 at 8:56
    
Thanks. The most important question I have is the first one. Instead of indexing the product_trait field to contain an array of values like ["color#green", "material#plastic"], how can I create a mapping that gives me an array of objects like [{trait: 'color', value: 'green'},{trait: 'material', value: 'plastic'}]? Once I have this mapped correctly then I think querying it correctly won't be too hard. To clarify - I'm asking what the mapping directive might look like. –  DustMason Sep 21 '12 at 12:25
    
OK, understood - answer below –  DrTech Sep 21 '12 at 13:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 21 down vote accepted

If you index your traits as:

[
    {
        trait: 'color', 
        value: 'green'
    },
    {
        trait: 'material', 
        value: 'plastic'
    }
]

this would be indexed internally as:

{
    trait: ['color', 'material' ],
    value: ['green', 'plastic' ]
}

which means that you could only ever query for docs which have a trait with value 'color' and a value with value green. There is no relationship between the trait and the value.

You have a few choices to solve this problem.

As single terms

The first you are already doing, and it is a good solution, ie storing the traits as single terms like:

['color#green`','material#plastic']

As objects

An alternative (assuming you have a limited number of trait names) would be to store them as:

{
    traits: {
        color:    'green',
        material: 'plastic'
    }
}

Then you could run queries against traits.color or traits.material.

As nested

If you want to keep your array structure, then you can use the nested type eg:

{
   "mappings" : {
      "product" : {
         "properties" : {

            ... other fields ...

            "traits" : {
               "type" : "nested",
               "properties" : {
                  "trait" : {
                     "index" : "not_analyzed",
                     "type" : "string"
                  },
                  "value" : {
                     "index" : "not_analyzed",
                     "type" : "string"
                  }
               }
            }
         }
      }
   }
}

Each trait/value pair would be indexed internally as a separate (but related) document, meaning that there would be a relationship between the trait and its value. You'd need to use nested queries or nested filters to query them, eg:

curl -XGET 'http://127.0.0.1:9200/test/product/_search?pretty=1'  -d '
{
   "query" : {
      "filtered" : {
         "query" : {
            "text" : {
               "name" : "my query terms"
            }
         },
         "filter" : {
            "nested" : {
               "path" : "traits",
               "filter" : {
                  "and" : [
                     {
                        "term" : {
                           "trait" : "color"
                        }
                     },
                     {
                        "term" : {
                           "value" : "green"
                        }
                     }
                  ]
               }
            }
         }
      }
   }
}
'

Combining facets, filtering and nested docs

You state that, when a user filters on eg color == green you want to show results only where color == green, but you still want to show the counts for all colors.

To do that, you need to use the filter param to the search API rather than a filtered query. A filtered query filters out the results BEFORE calculating the facets. The filter param is applied to query results AFTER calculating facets.

Here's an example where the final query results are limited to docs where color == green but the facets are calculated for all colors:

curl -XGET 'http://127.0.0.1:9200/test/product/_search?pretty=1'  -d '
{
   "query" : {
      "text" : {
         "name" : "my query terms"
      }
   },
   "filter" : {
      "nested" : {
         "path" : "traits",
         "filter" : {
            "and" : [
               {
                  "term" : {
                     "trait" : "color"
                  }
               },
               {
                  "term" : {
                     "value" : "green"
                  }
               }
            ]
         }
      }
   },
   "facets" : {
      "color" : {
         "nested" : "traits",
         "terms" : { "field" : "value" },
         "facet_filter" : {
            "term" : {
               "trait" : "color"
            }
         }
      }
   }
}
'
share|improve this answer
    
wow, a truly excellent answer. thank you very much for the help –  DustMason Sep 21 '12 at 14:11
    
@DrTech i'm looking for a similar solution: Let's say that 'traits' are dynamic, the user can create different traits. How can i handle a facet for each dynamic trait? –  Leonardo Pinto May 30 at 12:44
    
@DustMason how can you filter for multiple traits, eg (color: 'green' ou color: 'red') and (brand: 'abc', brand: 'def') and (material: 'plastic')? –  Leonardo Pinto Jul 4 at 14:12
    
@LeonardoPinto I'm sorry its been quite a while since I've worked on this code. I don't know! –  DustMason Jul 8 at 16:12

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