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Assuming data such as the following:

  ID      EffDate            Rate
   1      12/12/2011         100
   1      01/01/2012         110
   1      02/01/2012         120
   2      01/01/2012          40
   2      02/01/2012          50
   3      01/01/2012          25
   3      03/01/2012          30
   3      05/01/2012          35

How would I find the rate for ID 2 as of 1/15/2012? Or, the rate for ID 1 for 1/15/2012?

In other words, how do I do a query that finds the correct rate when the date falls between the EffDate for two records? (Rate should be for the date prior to the selected date).

Thanks, John

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about this:

SELECT Rate 
  FROM Table1 
 WHERE ID = 1 AND EffDate = (
  SELECT MAX(EffDate) 
    FROM Table1 
   WHERE ID = 1 AND EffDate <= '2012-15-01');

Here's an SQL Fiddle to play with. I assume here that 'ID/EffDate' pair is unique for all table (at least the opposite doesn't make sense).

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1  
Thanks for the SQL Fiddle tip as well. –  John Sep 19 '12 at 19:20
SELECT TOP 1 Rate FROM the_table
WHERE ID=whatever AND EffDate <='whatever'
ORDER BY EffDate DESC

if I read you right.

(edited to suit my idea of ms-sql which I have no idea about).

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LIMIT is proprietary MySQL syntax and not valid in SQL Server. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 19 '12 at 18:45
    
Is LIMIT a valid clause in MS-SQL? –  John Sep 19 '12 at 18:49
    
No, LIMIT is not valid in SQL Server. Msg 102: Incorrect syntax near 'LIMIT'. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 19 '12 at 18:51
    
Thanks Aaron,I just saw your comment. –  John Sep 19 '12 at 18:52
1  
+1 Should work too, and (I suppose) should be more efficient than my answer. ) –  raina77ow Sep 19 '12 at 18:58

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