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I've got following tables:

table 1:

+-----------+-------------+
| record_id | record_name |
+-----------+-------------+
| 0         | 'test'      |
| 1         | 'test1'     |
| 5         | 'mytest'    |
| 8         | 'ultratest' |
| ....      | ....        |
+-----------+-------------+

table 2:

+---------+-----------+
| user_id | record_id |
+---------+-----------+
| 1       | 0         |
| 2       | 0         |
| 3       | 0         |
| 4       | 0         |
| ....    | ....      |
+---------+-----------+

I want to assign each row of the table 2 a random record_id from the ids, present in the table 1 (0,1,5,8); the ids don't have to be unique.

I've read this answer, and it's no good for this case because the numbers assigned there are sequential

How do I do that with mysql?

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2 Answers 2

From mysql documentation

To obtain a random integer R in the range i <= R < j, use the expression FLOOR(i + RAND() * (j – i)). For example, to obtain a random integer in the range the range 7 <= R < 12, you could use the following statement:

SELECT FLOOR(7 + (RAND() * 5));
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2  
You might run into a small problem here. Let's say after you generate the a random number, that said number may not be a valid number inside table 1 (although it is within range). You need to worry about that edge case. –  Steven Sep 19 '12 at 19:35
select t2.user_id, t1.record_id 
from 
    t2
    inner join (
        select record_id
        from t1
        order by rand()
    ) t1 on 1 = 1
group by t2.user_id
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IMHO there should be a limit 1 or a top 1 in the record_id subquery. –  wildplasser Sep 19 '12 at 19:51

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