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I am having difficulty finding this memory leak.

I believe it has something to do with basin

int numbasinsx(int size, double *f)
{
    int maxBasin, maxRelabel, bcnt;
    unsigned int newgene;
    int *basin, *relabel;
    int relabelcnt;

    //
    // find the basins
    //
    maxBasin = 1<<size;
    basin = new int [maxBasin];
    for (int gene=0; gene<maxBasin; gene++) basin[gene] = 0;

    bool change = true;
    bcnt = 0;
    while (change) {
        change = false;

        for (int gene=0; gene<maxBasin; gene++) {

            bool dominated = false;
            for (int i=0; i<size; i++) {               // for all neighbors
                newgene = gene ^ (1<<i);               // newgene is a neighbor 1 bit away

                if (f[newgene] > f[gene]) dominated = true;  // if neighbor is better mark it

                if (basin[newgene]!=0) {                                        // something to copy
                    if (f[newgene] > f[gene]) {                                // gene is dominated
                        if (basin[gene]==0 || basin[gene]<basin[newgene]) {    // if not labeled or not lowest number
                            basin[gene] = basin[newgene];                      // then label or relabel
                            change = true;
                        }
                    }
                    else if (f[newgene] == f[gene]) {
                        if (basin[gene]<basin[newgene]) {
                            basin[gene] = basin[newgene];
                            change = true;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

            if (! dominated && basin[gene]==0) {
//                printf("max: %d %lg\n", gene, f[gene]);
                basin[gene] = ++bcnt;
                change = true;
            }
        }
    }


    //
    // relabel the basins
    //
    maxRelabel = maxBasin/2+1;
    relabel = new int [maxRelabel];
    for (int gene=0; gene<maxRelabel; gene++) relabel[gene] = 0;

    relabelcnt = 1;
    for (int gene=0; gene<maxBasin; gene++) {
        if (basin[gene]>=maxRelabel) printf("ERROR: trying to index %d into relabel array with max index of %d\n", basin[gene], maxRelabel-1);

        if (relabel[basin[gene]]==0) {
            relabel[basin[gene]] = relabelcnt++;
        }
//        printf("%d %lg %d\n", gene, f[gene], relabel[basin[gene]]);
    }
//    printf("%d\n", relabelcnt-1);

    delete basin;
    delete relabel;

    return relabelcnt-1;
}

I will leave the above up as to help others, but the new code with vectors is now at http://codepad.org/KiV85Brw. The vector run time is much slower than the delete[] version, and it is even segfaulting for large inputs. I am doing something wrong

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closed as too localized by jogojapan, sashoalm, Florian Peschka, quetzalcoatl, Michael Perrenoud Jun 4 '13 at 0:36

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4  
Why not use a vector? No more memory leaks! –  chris Sep 19 '12 at 19:59
1  
use delete[] for stuff allocated with new [] ... –  fritzone Sep 19 '12 at 20:00
1  
    
Yes, you are doing unnecessary copies, as I stated in another comment. You are also initializing explicitly the elements inside a vector, which is useless, since as chris stated, those are value-initialized to 0. As for the segfault, grab a debugger and start checking your code :D –  mfontanini Sep 19 '12 at 20:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you use operator new[] to allocate a bunch of bytes, then you must use operator delete[] to destroy them:

basin = new int [maxBasin];
//.....
delete[] basin;

Note that you're doing the same thing with relabel.

Anyway, for this kind of tasks, you should use std::vector:

std::vector<int> basin(maxBasin), relabel(maxRelabel); // We haz no leaks
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cheers for vector! –  xtofl Sep 19 '12 at 20:02
    
Awesome answer. It worked and you gave me a better solution! I am implementing with vectors now. Muchas Gracias –  SwimBikeRun Sep 19 '12 at 20:17
    
@RunHard, All you should need to do is change the declarations and get rid of the new[] and delete you have. You don't need to fill it with 0s, either, as the vector default-initializes the ints. –  chris Sep 19 '12 at 20:18
    
RunHard Glad it helped! @chris actually I believe elements are value-initialized, not default-initialized. If they were default initialized, then they'd contain garbage(since they're ints). –  mfontanini Sep 19 '12 at 20:25
1  
Yes, effectively, you can't implicitly convert a std::vector to an int*. Watch out, you are making unnecessary copies every time you call your function mark(which is most likely not what you want). You should take std::vectors by const reference: ..., const std::vector<int> &basin, ..... –  mfontanini Sep 19 '12 at 20:45

new[] must be followed by delete[], not merely delete. Your code for freeing arrays basin and relabel is all wrong.

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Both basin and relable are arrays. When you allocate an array on the heap with the new operator the syntax for deleting the array is different than the syntax for deleting a single variable. The correct syntax is:

delete[] basin;
delete[] relable;

I believe that the code you have, as written, only deletes the first element of each array.

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Since you are allocating an array, use delete [] basin;.
The delete operator is for single objects; the delete [] is for multiple objects (arrays).

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   basin = new int [maxBasin];

with arrays you should use operator delete[]. Check also for relabel.

It looks like it is a small local variable, are you sure that you want to use dynamic allocation? Why? If you have to than try unique_ptr.

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