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iOS has a pre declared property as per below:

@property(nonatomic, readonly) UIInterfaceOrientation interfaceOrientation;

Can I modify it to @property(nonatomic) UIInterfaceOrientation interfaceOrientation; for my project and then assign different values to "interfaceOrientation" variable in different controller methods of my class?

Should it create a problem if I modify the existing property?

Also, while googling, I somewhere read that if a @property(nonatomic) is not declared with "readonly" keyword, then its read-write by default. Is this rule applicable only for the properties defined by the developer and not for the pre-defined properties?

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2 Answers 2

No, if it's readonly then there is a reason. To provide different behavior you should subclass the UIViewController and override the specified methods [1] [2]:

- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
- (UIInterfaceOrientation)preferredInterfaceOrientationForPresentation
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Also, while googling, I somewhere read that if a @property(nonatomic) is not declared with "readonly" keyword, then its read-write by default. Is this rule applicable only for the properties defined by the developer and not for the pre-defined properties? –  tech_human Sep 19 '12 at 20:34

Unfortunately that's not possible. As Cocoa Touch is build based on design patterns (in our case Open Close Principle, see more at http://www.oodesign.com/open-close-principle.html), that would violate one of them. You can add more functions/features, but cannot modify the existing ones. Hope that helps

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Also, while googling, I somewhere read that if a @property(nonatomic) is not declared with "readonly" keyword, then its read-write by default. Is this rule applicable only for the properties defined by the developer and not for the pre-defined properties? –  tech_human Sep 19 '12 at 20:31
    
I guess this rule is the same in all cases. It's a language rule, and the developers of the iOS SDK use the same language - Objective-C, as all of us. Hope that makes sense –  ppalancica Sep 21 '12 at 20:16

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