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I am attempting to move a node into it's previous sibling's child, and the fact that everything is on the same level is making it a little tricky for me.

Illustration of my input:

<dl>
   <dlentry>
      <dt> Title 1 </dt>
      <dd> Title 1's definition </dd>
      <dt> Title 2 </dt>
      <dd> Title 2's definition </dd> 
      <dt> Title 3 </dt>
      <dd> Title 3's definition </dd>
   </dlentry>
</dl> 
<p> part of title 3's definition </p>
<p> another part of title 3's definition </p>

What I am attempting to do is to take those 2 <p> elements at the bottom and concatenate their text to end of the last <dd> element's text in <dlentry> because they are a part of that definition for "Title 3".

Desired output:

<dl>
   <dlentry>
      <dt> Title 1 </dt>
      <dd> Title 1's definition </dd>
      <dt> Title 2 </dt>
      <dd> Title 2's definition </dd> 
      <dt> Title 3 </dt>
      <dd> Title 3's definition part of title 3's definition another part of title 3's  definition </dd>
   </dlentry>
</dl>

Another issue I'm dealing with is because of how bad the XHTML is in my source document, I need to do a regex match to on the text for those <p> elements to make sure it doesn't hit anywhere else in the document.

I was able to successfully insert the first <p>'s text as desired but am having trouble getting it to work in so I can do my regex match and also getting that 2nd

element's text into the desired location as well.

Here is a code fragment from my stylesheet, using XSLT 2.0.

<xsl:analyze-string select="."
      regex="my regex expression here">

<xsl:template match="dlentry">

  <xsl:matching-substring>
    <dlentry>
     ** <xsl:copy-of select="node()[ position() lt last()]"/>
         <dd>
           <xsl:copy-of select="node()[last()]/text()" />
           <xsl:copy-of select=" parent::node()/following-sibling::node()[1]/text()"/>
         </dd>
    </dlentry>
  </xsl:matching-substring>

  <xsl:non-matching-substring>
      <xsl:value-of select=".">
  </xsl:non-matching-substring>

</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="p[preceding-sibling::node()[1][self::node()[name(.)='dl']]]" />
<xsl:template match="p[preceding-sibling::node()[2][self::node()[name(.)='dl']]]" />

At the code line with the ** asterisks Saxon throws an error saying "Axis step child::node() cannont be used here: the context item is an atomic value." I am not familiar with analyze-string but if I run my copy-of selects outside of analyze-string and just in a template, it runs fine.

Sorry that this question was kind of long but I wanted to share everything I had to this point.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This short and simple XSLT 1.0 (and of course it is also XSLT 2.0):

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:key name="kFollowing" match="p" use="generate-id(preceding-sibling::dl[1])"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="dlentry/dd[last()]">
  <dd>
   <xsl:apply-templates select=
    "(.|key('kFollowing', generate-id(ancestor::dl[1])))/text()"/>
  </dd>
 </xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="p"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<html>
    <dl>
        <dlentry>
            <dt> Title 1 </dt>
            <dd> Title 1's definition </dd>
            <dt> Title 2 </dt>
            <dd> Title 2's definition </dd>
            <dt> Title 3 </dt>
            <dd> Title 3's definition </dd>
        </dlentry>
    </dl>
    <p> part of title 3's definition </p>
    <p> another part of title 3's definition </p>
</html>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<html>
   <dl>
      <dlentry>
         <dt> Title 1 </dt>
         <dd> Title 1's definition </dd>
         <dt> Title 2 </dt>
         <dd> Title 2's definition </dd>
         <dt> Title 3 </dt>
         <dd> Title 3's definition  part of title 3's definition  another part of title 3's definition </dd>
      </dlentry>
   </dl>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again Dimitre! Pretty efficient method. –  Laterade Sep 20 '12 at 14:31
    
@Laterade, And convenient, too :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 20 '12 at 15:17
    
There are actually two differences compared to my solution. The difference first is that this solution requires whole dom tree to be loaded to memory in order to create the required key index. The second difference is with how <p> -elements are handled. This solution will include all <p> -elements after the dl. My solution will only include those <p> -elements that are directly after the <dl> -element. You can try the difference in output by placing a <div/> tag between the <p> -elements. Having said that, this is still a nice solution and deserves +1. –  Sami Korhonen Sep 20 '12 at 18:36
    
@SamiKorhonen, Actually, XSLT requires the complete representation (DOM or something similar) of the source XML document to be in RAM -- this isn't specific only to using keys. As for the second remark, the OP hasn't given us a more specific XML document and I didn't want to guess in vain. If a more specific document is provided, it is simple to modify this solution to take care of the new specifics. And thanks for the upvote. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 20 '12 at 18:42
    
While most implementations do load the complete representation of input document in memory, standard compliant processor can be written in a way that keeps only certain parts of the document in memory. But I think that discussions about the implementation is off topic, so I'll leave it here. –  Sami Korhonen Sep 20 '12 at 19:53

Not sure about efficiency, but following xsl should produce the requested output:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:template match="/doc">
  <xsl:for-each select="dl">
   <dl>
    <xsl:for-each select="dlentry">
      <xsl:apply-templates select="dt|dd"/>
    </xsl:for-each>
   </dl>
  </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="dt">
  <dt><xsl:value-of select="."/></dt>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="dd">
  <dd>
    <xsl:value-of select="."/>
    <!-- Check if this is the last element (= no dd/dd after) -->
    <xsl:if test="not(following-sibling::*)">
     <!-- Select dl's next sibling, if it's a <p> -->
     <xsl:for-each select="../../following-sibling::*[1][name() = 'p']">
      <!-- Call recursive template -->
      <xsl:call-template name="concat"/>
     </xsl:for-each>
    </xsl:if>
  </dd>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template name="concat">
   <xsl:value-of select="."/>
   <!-- Select p's next sibling, if it's a <p> -->
   <xsl:for-each select="following-sibling::*[1][name() = 'p']">
    <!-- Call recursive template -->
    <xsl:call-template name="concat"/>
   </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

And here's the input that I tested it with:

<doc>
 <dl>
   <dlentry>
      <dt> Title 1 </dt>
      <dd> Title 1's definition </dd>
      <dt> Title 2 </dt>
      <dd> Title 2's definition </dd>
      <dt> Title 3 </dt>
      <dd> Title 3's definition </dd>
   </dlentry>
 </dl>
 <p> part of title 3's definition </p>
 <p> another part of title 3's definition </p>
</doc>
share|improve this answer
    
Can't seem to get this working on my end, in your for-each statement it looks like you want to select dlentry's next sibling p, but dlentry has no siblings. dlentry and p are on different levels. dl and p are on the same level, sorry if the spacing didnt make that clear enough in my question. –  Laterade Sep 19 '12 at 22:20
    
Ahh sorry, I wrote the code comments in a hurry and looks like they didn't match the functionality. It should have stated "if dl's next sibling is a p element". I tested the xsl using xmlper.com. Notice that I had to add a root node called doc. –  Sami Korhonen Sep 19 '12 at 22:37
    
Ah ok, I will try and get this working with my implementation. –  Laterade Sep 20 '12 at 14:31

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