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What is the best way to get an ipython notebook into html format for use in a blog post?

It is easy to turn an ipython notebook into a PDF, but I'd rather publish as an html notebook.

I've found that if I download the notebook as a .ipynb file, then load it onto gist, then look at it with the ipython notebook viewer (nbviewer.ipython.org), THEN grab the html source, I can paste it into a blog post (or just load it as html anywhere) and it looks about right. However, if I use the "print view" option directly from ipython, the source contains a bunch of javascript rather than the processed html, which is not useful since the images and text are not directly included.

The %pastebin magic is also not particularly helpful for this task, since it pastes the python code and not the ipython notebook formatted code.

EDIT: Note that this is under development; see the comments under the accepted answer.

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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The right way is described in: http://blog.fperez.org/2012/09/blogging-with-ipython-notebook.html. Then you can do nbconvert -f blogger-html your_notebook.ipynb to get the html code for your post.

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where to get nbconvert: github.com/ipython/nbconvert –  fccoelho Oct 15 '12 at 16:00
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nbconvert got moved to the IPython repo github.com/ipython/ipython/tree/master/IPython/nbconvert –  Tim Swast Jul 11 '13 at 20:28
    
And now it's part of the official ipython 1.0 release. –  Mike Sep 9 '13 at 21:28
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The correct usage is ipython nbconvert --to html IPyNotebookTestBlogPost.ipynb in the dev version (v2.0) –  keflavich Sep 21 '13 at 23:06
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One step further from the answer above. If you want to create a PDF file.

  1. create a tex file

         nbconvert -f latex your_notebook.ipynb
    
  2. convert tex to pdf :

          pdflatex your_notebook.tex
    
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Is there any benefit to this approach over simply "printing" and saving as PDF? i.e., does texing improve formatting at all? –  keflavich Sep 22 '12 at 20:25
    
Try it! It does change quite a bit. –  Thriveth Oct 25 '13 at 15:09
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