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I've been trying out some of the view code from Erica Sadun's book "The iPhone Developer's Cookbook" and found some code I don't understand. Here's the code for a loadView method:

- (void)loadView
{
	// Create the main view
	UIView *contentView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame: 
		[[UIScreen mainScreen] applicationFrame]];
	contentView.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
	self.view = contentView;
   [contentView release];

	// Get the view bounds as our starting point
	CGRect apprect = [contentView bounds];

	// Add each inset subview
	UIView *subview = [[UIView alloc] 
		initWithFrame:CGRectInset(apprect, 32.0f, 32.0f)];
	subview.backgroundColor = [UIColor lightGrayColor];
	[contentView addSubview:subview];
	[subview release];
}

My question is why does she release contentView, but then use it again in [contentView addSubview:subview]? Has self.view = contentView retained contentView?

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That looks wrong. contentView isn't going to get released until the end of the method, so this probably doesn't cause any problems, but I can't imagine why you would intentionally build it this way. –  kubi Aug 9 '09 at 0:33
    
Not really. The assignment to self.view retains contentView, so releasing it right afterward is the closest you can get to when the object was created. It is intentionally built this way because (in the Cocoa paradigm) it makes sense for the view controller to retain the view. –  Quinn Taylor Aug 9 '09 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you look in the documentation for UIViewController, you'll see that the view property is declared as:

@property(nonatomic, retain) UIView *view;

This means that when you use the setView: method (or use .view on the left hand side of the =), then whatever value you pass in will be retained. So, if you go through the code and look at retain counts, you'll get this:

- (void)loadView {
    // Create the main view
    UIView *contentView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame: 
            [[UIScreen mainScreen] applicationFrame]];  //retain count +1
    contentView.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];  //retain count +1
    self.view = contentView;  //retain count +2
    [contentView release];  //retain count +1

    // Get the view bounds as our starting point
    CGRect apprect = [contentView bounds];

    // Add each inset subview
    UIView *subview = [[UIView alloc] 
            initWithFrame:CGRectInset(apprect, 32.0f, 32.0f)];
    subview.backgroundColor = [UIColor lightGrayColor];
    [contentView addSubview:subview];
    [subview release];

}

I'd say that the really interesting thing is that after releasing contentView, we can still send messages to it, because the object living at the end of contentView's pointer still exists (since it was retained by calling setView:).

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1  
This is correct, but I personally avoid this style/pattern -- if at some point you decide to change that property from retain to assign, then this code will spontaneously begin crashing. Of course, this isn't an issue with the UIViewController.view property, but for your own properties it's asking for trouble down the road. –  Daniel Dickison Aug 9 '09 at 1:03
1  
Yes, this is exactly why it works, and it is horrible form. Once you release a particular reference you should not use it again, it is error prone. The release should either be moved too the end, or all appearances of contentView beyond the release should be changed to self.view. –  Louis Gerbarg Aug 9 '09 at 2:47
    
It doesn't really qualify as a style, unless "<x> considered harmful" is a style. –  Amagrammer Aug 9 '09 at 4:23
1  
I disagree with a blanket generalization of it being horrible form. UIViewController is a public API, and the property attributes cannot change without breaking dependent code. This idiom is not necessarily appropriate for all situations, but it's perfect for coupling a view controller with the view it controls. Further, releasing directly after the assignment is about the closest you can get to the object creation. In fact, if there weren't an assignment to set the background color, I would probably wrap an autorelease around the object creation and assign it directly to the property. –  Quinn Taylor Aug 9 '09 at 15:43
    
If it was autoreleased it would be fine, the thing that is bad form is accessing an variable through an lval after that lval has been released before it has been reassigned. In this case release and autorelease art totally different beasts, because autorelease has no chance of invalidating the data pointed to until after the pool is drained. –  Louis Gerbarg Aug 10 '09 at 23:47

If u declare ur property like so @property(nonatomic,retain) ... TheN yes the property is retained when assigned. that is probably what's going on

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Formulating a gramatically correct answer and avoiding IM-style abbreviations will probably help avoid downvotes in the future. (I didn't downvote, I'm just saying...) –  Quinn Taylor Aug 9 '09 at 15:44
    
I know , but it's hard when typing responses from the iPhone lol, when I do I write the bare minimum and can't really formulatecode well, but I think this answer would help the Asker anyway so I posted it –  Daniel Aug 9 '09 at 16:23

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