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I am a bit confused and would like to an explanation.

I am using Java Play 2 with Akka actors. I start the system by using play run.

However, I just saw a video that used the command:

play akka start 

to start a Play framework that supports Akka. Is this required for the Play 2?

Thanks all!

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Most probably you saw a log of Akka's start when used in the controller, as @szegedi pointed play akka start isn't a valid console's command. –  biesior Sep 19 '12 at 22:02
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BTW, just curious, could you show us that video? –  biesior Sep 19 '12 at 22:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Play 2.0 doesn't use akka as a command line argument as far as I know (at least its not present in sbt's help command, and I got an error trying to use it). The difference between play run and play start is the following:

play run - starts the application in debug mode, with automatic recompilation of classes (if they are changed and you'll refresh the browser's window, your app will be recompiled) This is for development.

play ~run - same as above, with that difference, the recompilation process starts as soon as changes in the files are detected (doesn't wait for browser's refresh)

play start - starts the application in production mode, no recompiling, much better performance, this is intended for everyday running of the application.

For final production version it's best option to prepare standalone version of your application.

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thanks for the answer. this is the link to the video vimeo.com/10793443. –  faisal abdulai Sep 19 '12 at 22:17
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@faisalabdulai that link explains everything, it doesn't demonstrate Play 2.0 with built-in Akka, but a module for Akka integration for Play 1.x by Dustin Whitney see: playframework.org/modules/akka. You need to pay more attention to filter tutorials targeted for Play 1.x and 2.x as they are quite other branches. –  biesior Sep 19 '12 at 22:30

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